Contributors

Issue Eighteen

Melbourne-born and based, Peter Bakowski writes as clearly as possible. His poems continue to appear in literary journals worldwide. In 2017 Guillotine Press will publish his sixth full-length poetry collection, The Courage Season.

Stuart Barnes is the poetry editor of Tincture Journal. His first collection Glasshouses (UQP, 2016) won the 2015 Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize, was commended for the 2016 FAW Anne Elder Award, and was shortlisted for the 2017 ASAL Mary Gilmore Award. He’s translating Imma Tubella’s Un secret de l’Empordà into English. He tweets @StuartABarnes.

Craig Billingham’s poems, short stories and reviews have appeared widely, including most recently in Verity LaAustralian Book Review, Southerly, and LinQ. A collection of poems, Public Transport (Hope Street Press), was recently launched at the Sydney Writers’ Festival.

Craig Burnett is a former journalist, and now works for a global politics think tank. He was born in Dundee and lives in South London, where he writes about awkward conversations, nasty surprises and the weight of the past. He has stories published or forthcoming in StorgyFictive Dream and the Glasgow Review of Books.

Cher Chidzey migrated to Australia thirty-eight years ago and has published poetry, short stories, a memoir called The House of 99 Closed Doors and most recently the novel Ken’s Quest. Her stories have been read on Southern FM, 3CR, Radio Adelaide, and she was interviewed by R. Aedy on Radio National for the Life Matters program.

Benjamin Dodds is a Sydney-based poet who was born in the NSW Riverina. His debut collection Regulator was published by Puncher & Wattmann Poetry in 2014. His work has appeared in Best Australian Poems (2014), Meanjin, Cordite, Tincture Journal, and on ABC Radio National’s Poetica program. He occasionally writes reviews, and tweets @coalesce79.

Dave Drayton was an amateur banjo player, Vice President of the Australian Sweat Bathing Association, a founding member of the Atterton Academy, and the author of Haiturograms (Stale Objects dePress) and Poetic Pentagons (Spacecraft Press).

Liam Ferney’s most recent collection, Content, was shortlisted for the Queensland poetry prize. His second collection, Boom, was shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s and Queensland poetry prizes. His work has been widely published internationally and translated into Korean and Chinese. He lives in Brisbane, working as a media manager and toiling as a left back.

Andrew Galan is an internationally published poet and co-producer of renowned poetry event BAD!SLAM!NO!BISCUIT!. Showcased at events including the Woodford, National Folk and Queensland Poetry festivals, and Chicago’s Uptown Poetry Slam, his verse has appeared in journals such as Best Australian Poems (2011), Otoliths, Verity La and Cordite. That Place of Infested Roads (Life During Wartime) (KF&S Press, 2013) is his first book. His latest is For All The Veronicas (The Dog Who Staid) (Bareknuckle Books, 2016).

Irma Gold’s short fiction has been widely published in literary journals, including Meanjin, Island, Westerly, Review of Australian Fiction and Going Down Swinging, and in anthologies, including Australian Love Stories edited by Cate Kennedy. Her critically acclaimed debut collection of short fiction, Two Steps Forward, was shortlisted for or won a number of awards. She is also the author of three children’s picture books, with a fourth, Seree’s Story, due out with Walker Books, and is currently finishing a novel which recently won the NSW Writers’ Centre Varuna Fellowship. She is the editor of a number of anthologies, including The Invisible Thread, an official publication of the National Year of Reading 2012 and the Centenary of Canberra 2013. She is Editor at Melbourne publisher Inkerman & Blunt, Convener of Editing at the University of Canberra, and Ambassador for the ACT Chief Minister’s Reading Challenge.

Eda Gunaydin is a writer and researcher from Western Sydney. She is a 2016 WestWords Emerging Writers’ Fellow and writes about postcolonialism and the Turkish diaspora. She has been shortlisted for the Monash University Undergraduate Creative Writing Prize, the Scribe Nonfiction Prize for Young Writers, and published in Voiceworks, The Doctor T.J. Eckleburg Review, and the University of Sydney Anthology.

Jill Jones has published nine books of poetry, and a number of chapbooks. The latest is The Leaves Are My Sisters, a self-published chapbook from an Adelaide-based collaborative venture, Little Windows Press. Other recent books include The Beautiful Anxiety, which won the Victorian Premier’s Prize for Poetry in 2015, and Breaking the Days. She edited, with Michael Farrell, Out of the Box: Contemporary Australian Gay and Lesbian Poets. A new book, Brink, is due from Five Islands Press in mid-2017.

Johannes Klabbers is a Dutch/Australian writer and posthumanist therapist, currently living in Europe. He is the author of I Am Here: Stories From A Cancer Ward (Scribe Aus/UK 2016), which tells the story of an academic in the Australian outback who takes a voluntary redundancy and reinvents himself as a secular pastoral worker in the largest cancer hospital in the southern hemisphere. The Australian described it as “wonderfully insightful”. His website is johannesk.com and he tweets @johklab, is on Facebook @johkla and blogs on Medium @johannesk.

Rozanna Lilley is a social anthropologist and an author. Her poetry has appeared in national newspapers (The Age, Sydney Morning Herald and Canberra Times), as well as in WesterlyRegime Magazine, Australian Poetry and Best Australian Poems (2015). Her memoir writing has been published in Westerly, Mascara Literary Review, Southerly and Hoopla, and reprinted in Best Australian Essays (2013, 2014). She has a hybrid volume of memoir and poetry forthcoming with UWA Publishing.

Nick Marland is an award-winning writer of fiction and non-fiction who has appeared in Tincture Journal, Going Down Swinging, Seizure, The Lifted Brow, Griffith REVIEW, Voiceworks, Stories of Sydney, the UTS Writers’ Anthology and ABC’s The Drum. He once tripped up Woody Allen and spent three days as an illegal alien in Belarus.

Alexandra O’Sullivan has a BA in Media Communications, Literature and Creative Writing. She writes articles for The Radical Notion, along with writing fiction and creative non-fiction.

Felicity Plunkett’s Vanishing Point won the Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Prize and was short-listed for several other awards. She is the author of the chapbook Seastrands and a forthcoming collection with Pitt St Poetry.

Kevin Del Principe is a writer and filmmaker who teaches screenwriting at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He’s originally from a town outside Buffalo, New York, and carries it with him wherever he goes. Kevin has short stories at WOLVES Magazine and Crack the Spine, and his short film Those Little Monsters premiered at the Other Venice Film Festival.

Anna Ryan-Punch is a Melbourne writer. Her previous publications include work in Westerly, Antipodes, The AgeIsland, Overland, Southerly, and the anthology Prayers of a Secular World. Her work has also appeared in issues Four, Six, and Thirteen of Tincture Journal.

John Sheng has lived in Australia since 1989. He writes short fiction in Chinese and has been published in Otherland and in overseas journals.

Stephen Lehane Smith is a Beijing-based comedian and writer. He has been published in journals such as Stilts and Birdville Magazine, and is a regular MC/feature for the Weilaugh Comedy Club in Beijing.

Elizabeth Tan is a West Australian writer whose work has recently appeared in Best Australian Stories (2016), Seizure, Overland and Pencilled In. Her first novel, Rubik, was released by Brio in 2017.

Catherine Vidler’s most recent publications are two collections of visual works created in response to ‘chaingrass’, a word from Bill Manhire’s poem ‘Falseweed’: one published by SOd Press and the other by zimZalla. Catherine edits trans-Tasman literary magazine Snorkel.

Mark Ward is a poet from Dublin, Ireland. He was the 2015 Poet Laureate for Glitterwolf and his work has appeared in Assaracus, Tincture JournalThe Good Men Project, HIV Here + Now, Storm Cellar, Studies in Arts and Humanities, Off the Rocks, The Wild Ones, Vast Sky, Emerge and the anthologies, Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed, The Myriad Carnivaland Not Just Another Pretty Face. He is a regular on Dublin’s spoken word scene and was featured in the 2016 Lingo Festival. He founded Impossible Archetype, a journal of LGBTQ+ poetry. He has recently finished two books, a chapbook called Circumference and a full-length collection called How to Live When Life Subtractshttp://astintinyourspotlight.wordpress.com.

Ouyang Yu, now based in Melbourne, came to Australia in early 1991 and, by August 2016, had published 83 books of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, literary translation and literary criticism in English and Chinese. He also edits Australia’s only Chinese literary journal, Otherland.


Issue Seventeen

Charlotte Adderley is a creative non-fiction writer and burn survivor. She holds Communication and Arts degrees from the University of Queensland, and has journalistic work published in lifestyle magazines such as The West End Magazine and Indulge Magazine. She volunteers with burns patients and carers around Brisbane assisting in their recovery and rehabilitation.

Pam Brown is an editor, reviewer and author of various chapbooks and pamphlets as well as eighteen books of poetry, most recently Missing up (Vagabond Press 2015), and a folio of collage and other graphics, Westernity (Stale Objects dePress, 2016). She lives in Sydney.

Dominic Carew is a lawyer and writer from Sydney. His short stories have appeared in TEXT Journal, Verity La, Scum Mag and Going Down Swinging online. He won the 2016 Sydney Writers’ Room Short Story Award and has been commended/shortlisted in numerous other short story competitions.

Eileen Chong is a Sydney poet. Her books are Burning Rice (2012), Peony (2014) and Painting Red Orchids (2016), all from Pitt Street Poetry. She has been shortlisted for the Anne Elder Award 2012, the Prime Minister’s Literary Award 2013, and most recently, the Victorian Premier’s Literary Award 2017. Another Language (2017) is forthcoming with George Braziller in New York. www.eileenchong.com.au

Aidan Coleman has written two collections of poetry which have been shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Kenneth Slessor Prize, the Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature and the Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards. Besides poetry, he writes reviews, speeches, and Shakespeare textbooks.

Tricia Dearborn’s poetry has been widely published in literary journals and is represented in numerous anthologies, including Contemporary Australian Poetry, Australian Poetry since 1788 and The Best Australian Poems (2010, 2012). She is on the editorial board of Plumwood Mountain, an online journal of ecopoetry and ecopoetics, and was poetry editor for the February 2016 issue. She has been awarded several grants by the Australia Council, and a 2017 Residential Fellowship at Varuna, the Writers’ House, to work on her manuscript in progress. Her most recent collection of poetry is The Ringing World, published by Puncher & Wattmann.

Ailsa Dunlop is a writer and stand-up comic based in Melbourne.

SJ Finn is a poet and fiction writer. She lives in Melbourne, Australia, and her latest novel is Down to the River. She can be found at www.sjfinn.com.

Denis Fitzpatrick has been writing for over thirty years and has been labelled “Sydney’s hippest writer” and “the hippest of off-beat writers” by the publishing house, Independence Jones (now, sadly, no longer in business). He is in full remission with paranoid schizophrenia, and over the past several years has written almost exclusively about mental illness, from the point of view of those so affected. He is published monthly at The Short Stories Club, a blog run to promote new and emerging writers, and has several books available online. He is also having a collection of his stories published in 2018 by Waldorf Publishing, again, mostly stories viewing mental illness positively, if a little bizarrely. He was also published in Issue Fourteen of Tincture Journal. You can find him on Twitter @viearus.

Sean Gandert’s first novel, Lost in Arcadia, will be published in May 2017 by 47 North. He has also contributed stories or essays to the South Dakota Review, Columbia Journalism Review, Solstice Magazine and elsewhere. He is a graduate of Bennington College’s MFA program, and hails from Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Mindy Gill is a Brisbane writer whose work has appeared in Australian Poetry Journal, Voiceworks, Hecate and elsewhere. She writes for Peril Magazine.

Grace Jarvis is a second year university student in the throes of an arts degree based existential crisis. She was the recipient of the Queensland Theatre Company’s Young Playwright’s Award in 2015 and feels she needs to mention it constantly as it’s the most impressive thing she’s ever done. You can find her on Twitter@grace4jarvis.

Rebecca Jessen lives in Brisbane. She is the award-winning author of Gap (UQP, 2014). In 2015 she won the QLD Premier’s Young Writers and Publishers Award. Her writing has been published in Overland, Meanjin, Going Down Swinging, The Lifted Brow, Tincture Journal, and many more. Rebecca blogs at becjessen.wordpress.com.

Philip Keenan is a writer from Sydney with an interest in the strangeness of familiar things. Philip’s work has previously appeared in Issues Seven and Thirteen of Tincture Journal.

Johannes Klabbers is a Dutch/Australian writer and posthumanist therapist, currently living in Europe. He is the author of I Am Here: Stories From A Cancer Ward (Scribe Aus/UK 2016), which tells the story of an academic in the Australian outback who takes a voluntary redundancy and reinvents himself as a secular pastoral worker in the largest cancer hospital in the southern hemisphere. The Australian described it as “wonderfully insightful”. His website is johannesk.com and he tweets @johklab, is on Facebook @johkla and blogs on Medium @johannesk.

Rosanna Licari is an Australian writer. Her work has appeared in various journals and anthologies. In 2015, she won the inaugural Philip Bacon Ekphrasis Poetry Prize for her poem ‘The Wait’. She is the editor and publisher of StylusLit.

Tamara Lazaroff is a Brisbane-based emerging writer of fiction and non-fiction, and a sometimes-poet. She is currently working on her first collection of short stories and a novella based on her roots tour travel and study through the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Her work has been published, or is forthcoming in various journals in Australia, New Zealand and the U.K, including Meanjin, SoutherlyVerity La, Headland and The Wrong Quarterly.

Douglas W. Milliken is the author of the novel To Sleep as Animals and several chapbooks, most recently the pocket-sized editions Cream River and One Thousand Owls Behind Your Chest. His stories have been honoured by the Maine Literary Awards, the Pushcart Prize, and Glimmer Train, and have been published in Slice, the Collagist, and the Believer, among others. ‘Water Lily’ was written as part of a fellowship with the Hewnoaks Artists Colony. His story ‘Arena’ was published in Issue Seven of Tincture Journal and is available online. www.douglaswmilliken.com

Nathanael O’Reilly was born in Warrnambool & raised in Ballarat, Brisbane and Shepparton; he currently resides in Texas. He is the author of the full-length collection Distance and the chapbooks Cult, Suburban Exile and Symptoms of Homesickness. His second full-length collection, Preparations for Departure, is forthcoming from UWAP Poetry. O’Reilly is the recipient of an Emerging Writers Grant from the Literature Board of the Australia Council for the Arts. His poems have appeared in journals & anthologies around the world, including Antipodes, Australian Love Poems, Blackmail Press, Cordite, fourWLiNQ, Mascara Literary ReviewPostcolonial Text, Prosopisia, Red River Review, Snorkel, Social AlternativesTincture Journal, Transnational LiteratureVerity La, Writ Poetry Review and Windmills.

Alexandra O’Sullivan has a BA in Media Communications, Literature and Creative Writing. She writes articles for The Radical Notion, along with writing fiction and creative non-fiction.

Mark Roberts is a Sydney based writer, critic and publisher. He is the founding editor of Rochford Street Review (rochfordstreetreview.com) and has run the small literary press Rochford Street Press (rochfordstreetpress.wordpress.com) since the early 1980s. His latest poetry collection, Concrete Flamingos, was published by Island Press in 2016.

Thom Sullivan grew up on a farm in Wistow/Bugle Ranges in the Adelaide Hills. He had a short collection of poems, ‘Airborne’, published in New Poets 14 (Wakefield Press) in 2009. Since then he’s edited or co-edited seven published books of poetry. His poems have appeared in The Best Australian Poems (2014, 2015), Australian Love Poems, and as part of Australian Book Review’s ‘States of Poetry’ anthology. He was a featured writer at Adelaide Writers’ Week in 2016.

Paul Threlfall is a writer and librarian based in Melbourne, Australia. His fiction has been published in Tincture Journal and performed as part of 1,001 Nights Cast, and his poetry has appeared in Litmus Magazine. Paul has also won awards for three of his short stories, in the City of Boroondara, City of Greater Dandenong and University of Melbourne short story competitions.


Issue Sixteen

Ivy Alvarez’s latest poetry collection is The Everyday English Dictionary (London: Paekakariki Press, 2016). Previous collections include Hollywood Starlet (Chicago: dancing girl press, 2015) and Disturbance (Wales: Seren, 2013). A recipient of writing fellowships from MacDowell Colony, Hawthornden Castle and Fundacion Valparaiso, her work appears in journals and anthologies in many countries and online, with selected poems translated into Russian, Spanish, Japanese and Korean. She lives in New Zealand. www.ivyalvarez.com.

Joshua Baird is a twenty-four year old PhD student living in Geelong, Australia, and is completing a thesis that highlights links between crises of masculinity and unreliable narration. His work has been featured in publications such as Voiceworks, Otoliths, and Imagine.

Simon Barker is an Australian living in Sydney although for several years he lived in the Bay Area of California. Other stories of his have recently appeared in Literally Stories, Halfway Down the Stairs and Green Briar Review.

Stuart Barnes is the poetry editor of Tincture Journal. In 2015 he won the Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize, resulting in the publication of Glasshouses (UPQ 2016). He blogs at stuartabarnes.wordpress.com.

Lucille Bellucci grew up in Shanghai with an Italian-Dutch-Indonesian father and Chinese mother. Exiled by the communist regime in 1952, her family sailed to Italy, where they lived five years before immigrating to the United States. Lucille has five novels and her stories, essays, and poems have earned nine first-place awards and a nomination to the Pushcart Prize. Her short book Meow’s Way won the Animals Books Awards in 2014.

Michelle Cahill is a prize-winning poet and essayist. Her stories and essays have appeared in Westerly, Australian Book Review, Meanjin, The Weekend Australian and Southerly. She won the Hilary Mantel International Short Story Prize and was placed second in the ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize as well as being shortlisted in several other fiction and poetry prizes. She has received grants from The Australia Council and the Copyright Agency Limited. She was a fellow at Hawthornden Castle and Visting Scholar at UNC Charlotte. She is the founding editor of Mascara Literary Review and a Doctoral Candidate in Creative Arts at the University of Wollongong. Her most recent books are Letter to Pessoa (Giramondo) and The Herring Lass (Arc, UK).

a.j. carruthers is an experimental poet and critic. He is the author of the academic book Notational Experiments in North American Long Poems, 1961-2011: Stave Sightings (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) and the first volume of a lifelong long poem AXIS Book 1: Areal (Tokyo: Vagabond, 2014). Other titles include The Tulip Beds: A Toneme Suite (Vagabond 2013) and two downloadable online books, Opus 16 on Tehching Hsieh (Oakland CA: GaussPDF, 2016): http://dl.gauss-pdf.com/GPDF221-AJC-O16OTH.pdf, and Ode to On Kawara (Buffalo NY: Hysterically Real, 2016): http://www.hystericallyreal.com/post/150137803670/ode-to-on-kawara-by-aj-carruthers-pdf. He is poetry reviews editor for Southerly magazine, essays editor of Rabbit Poetry Journal and the founder of SOd press. Tweets the weather @axispoet.

Mary Chydiriotis is a Social Worker and writer living in Melbourne. Her poems have been published in journals and anthologies both locally and overseas, including Social Alternatives, Garfield Lake Review, OffsetShort and Twisted, Tincture Journal, The Unprecedented and Right Now, Human Rights in Australia. Mary has worked with migrants and refugees in the community sector for fifteen years.

Cameron Colwell is a writer, critic, and poet from Sydney, Australia. He has appeared on a panel at National Young Writers Festival, has had work published in The Writer’s Quarterly, Writers Bloc, Heaps Gay and The Star Observer, and was the 2013 winner of the Mavis Thorpe Clark award for a collection of short stories. His Twitter is @cameron___c and his work can be found at neonslicked.wordpress.com.

Rico Craig is currently hassling publishers to accept his first collection, seriously all you need to do is promise the world and he’ll send a manuscript. His writing has appeared in places like London Magazine, Meanjin, Cordite, Island and Prelude. To find out more about recent publications visit @ricocraig.

By day, Kelsey Dean teaches English to Turkish children in Istanbul; by night, she paints, writes, and cuddles stray cats and dogs. Her writing can be found in several literary journals and anthologies, including 101 Words, 3Elements Review, Ember: A Journal of Luminous Things, and the Revenge Anthology by Robocup Press. She was also nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2015 for a piece published in Vine Leaves Literary Journal.

Hailing from regional Victoria, Kirby Fenwick is an emerging writer and editor currently studying at RMIT. Her work has appeared on Writers Bloc and SPOOK Magazine. When she’s not reading submissions for Tincture Journal you can generally find her on Twitter @kirbykirbybee.

Adam Ford is the author of the poetry collections The Third Fruit is a Bird and Not Quite the Man for the Job, the short story collection Heroes and Civilians and the novel Man Bites Dog. His writing has appeared in Australian Author, Writers Bloc, Meanjin, Cordite, Going Down SwingingAurealis, The Mammoth Book of Kaiju, Overland, Best Australian Poems and The Age. He lives in Chewton with his wife, two daughters, a dog and cat and the ghosts of numerous chickens. His website is theotheradamford.wordpress.com.

Jane Frank’s chapbook Milky Way of Words was published by Ginninderra Press in 2016. Her unpublished manuscript Dancing with Charcoal Feet was highly recommended in the 2016 Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize. She teaches in Humanities at Griffith University.

Eduardo Frajman grew up in San José, Costa Rica. He graduated from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and received a PhD in political science from the University of Maryland. He spent the 2015−2016 academic year in Oslo with his family. His essays and short stories have appeared in The Point, Electric Literature, Southern Pacific Review, and many other publications.

Moll Green lives between Los Angeles and Vancouver, writing screenplays, comics, and lots of other stuff. Moll’s recent work has appeared in LGBTQ Monologues That Are Actually Funny, Skyd Magazine, The Rainbow Hub, Graphic Policy, and the Harvey Award-nominated 27, A Comic Anthology. Moll’s upcoming projects and publications include a story in the All The King’s Men sci-fi collection, Little Bird Media’s BLOCKED anthology, and the indie horror movie At Sunrise.

Stu Hatton is a poet and freelance writer/editor based in Dja Dja Wurrung country. His work has been published in The Age, Best Australian Poems, Cordite Poetry Review, Overland, and elsewhere. He has published two collections: How to be Hungry (2010) and Glitching (2014). He sometimes posts things at outerblog.tumblr.com.

Born and raised in Nigeria, Timothy Ogene has since lived in Liberia, the US, Germany, and the UK. He holds degrees from St Edward’s and Oxford Universities. His first collection, Descent & Other Poems, appeared this year from Deerbrook Editions.

Adam Ouston’s work has appeared in many literary magazines as well as news and culture publications. He is the recipient of the 2014 Erica Bell Literary Award for his manuscript The Party, which was also shortlisted in the 2015 Tasmanian Premier’s Literary Awards. He lives in Hobart.

Belinda Rule is a Melbourne writer of poetry and fiction. Residencies and fellowships include Varuna, Bundanon Trust and Squaw Valley Community of Writers, USA. Her work has appeared extensively in journals and anthologies including Meanjin, Australian Book Review, Westerly, Eureka Street, Sleepers Almanac, Cordite Poetry Review and Best Australian Poems.

Stephen Samuel was short listed for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards for an Unpublished Manuscript in 2012 and was awarded in 2013 the Varuna Fiction Award. He is a former festival director of the Clunes Booktown Festival.

Louise Slocombe lives in Wellington, New Zealand, city of shaky ground, challenging topography and amazing views. She has been known to write fiction and has had work published in The Yellow Room and Takahē Magazine, but these days she writes mostly non-fiction about nature, places and journeys and how we experience them. She is currently writing about birds, both living and extinct.

rob walker pron./rob wȯkə r / 1. a cantankerous curmudgeon with a titanium knee 2. an original cliché 3. www.robwalkerpoet.com

Mark Ward is a poet from Dublin, Ireland. He was the 2015 Poet Laureate for Glitterwolf and his work has appeared in Assaracus, Tincture JournalThe Good Men Project, HIV Here + Now, Off the Rocks, The Wild OnesEmerge and the anthologies, Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed, The Myriad Carnival and Not Just Another Pretty Face. He has recently completed his first chapbook, How to Live When Life Subtracts, and is currently working on a novel-in-verse called Circumferenceastintinyourspotlight.wordpress.com.

Alice Whitmore’s fiction and poetry have been published in Going Down Swinging,  VergeVoiceworks, Askew, Egg Poetry and Penguin Specials. Her translations and non-fiction work have been published with Giramondo, Sydney Review of Books, Asymptote, Dumbo FeatherMexico City Lit, Ox & Pigeon and a number of peer-reviewed academic journals.


Issue Fifteen

David Adès is a Pushcart Prize nominated poet now living in Sydney after living in Pittsburgh since 2011. He has been a member of Friendly Street Poets since 1979. He is the author of Mapping the World (Friendly Street Poets / Wakefield Press), which was commended for the Anne Elder Award 2008, and the chapbook Only the Questions Are Eternal (Garron Publishing). He was a volunteer editor of the Australian Poetry Members Anthology, Metabolism. His poems have appeared widely in Australia and the US in publications including over 20 of the Friendly Street Readers, and numerous literary magazines. In 2014 David was awarded the inaugural University of Canberra Vice-Chancellor’s International Poetry Prize and was also shortlisted for the Newcastle Poetry Prize. In 2016 he was a finalist in the Dora and Alexander Raynes Poetry Prize.

Jov Almero lives in the Philippines and has had stories published in BarrelhouseQuarterly Literary Review Singapore, Plural, and Kritika Kultura. ‘My Boy Dalya’ is part of a project in progress: a collection of short travel stories titled Banana Pancake.

Ben Armstrong is a bushwalking guide and occasional student from Hobart. His work has been published in Picton Grange Quarterly Review and Tasmanian Geographic. He doesn’t intend to leave Tasmania.

Joe Baumann possesses a Ph.D. in English from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where he served as the editor-in-chief of Rougarou: an Online Literary Journal and the Southwestern Review. He is the author of Ivory Children: Flash Fictions, and his work has appeared in Tulane ReviewWillow Review, Hawai’i Review, Jelly Bucket and many others, and is forthcoming in West Trade Review and others. He teaches composition, literature, and creative writing at St. Charles Community College in St. Charles, Missouri, and was recently nominated for two Pushcart Prizes. He is the founding editor and editor-in-chief of The Gateway Review: A Journal of Magical Realism.

British born with Germanic roots (very different from Jamaican roots in the fun stakes) Lucie Britsch fears her writing career peaked too soon when she won a poopscoop slogan contest as a child. Her writing has since appeared in Barrelhouse, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, This is Pinball, The Millions and Catapult Story and she has gained an honourable mention in Glimmer Train. She says she is working on some books but is mostly reading other people’s and realising hers is rubbish in comparison.

Lachlan Brown teaches and researches at Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga. His first book, Limited Cities, was published by Giramondo in 2012 and was highly commended for the Dame Mary Gilmore Award. He is currently working on a poetry manuscript about his Chinese-Australian heritage (forthcoming) and he is also collaborating with the visual artist Tony Curran on an exhibition that will show at ACNA in 2017.

Mindy Gill is a Brisbane-based writer, undertaking her Honours in Creative Writing at the Queensland University of Technology. Her work has appeared at foam:e, and is forthcoming in Voiceworks and the Australian Poetry Journal. Her research interest lies in the intersection between food and the Asian-Australian identity.

Vivien Huang is a student who reads by day and writes by night. She enjoys exploring the magic of stories, minds and felines. She is currently studying in Sydney.

Ella Jeffery is writer and editor from northern NSW, currently based in Brisbane and completing a PhD in contemporary Australian poetry at Queensland University of Technology. Her poems and short fiction have appeared in Best Australian Poems 2013, Cordite, Mascara Literary Review and elsewhere.

S .K. Kelen’s most recent book was Island Earth: New and Selected Poems.

Martine Kropkowski is a Brisbane-based writer, editor and playwright. Her play In the Bag was a finalist for the People’s Choice Award at Sydney’s 2009 Short+Sweet Festival. She enjoys writing in all its forms and has written non-fiction for various custom and lifestyle magazines, such as Style Magazine and Contact Magazine, as well as online for thewritersbloc.net. Martine is working towards a Master of Arts in Writing, Editing and Publishing at The University of Queensland and spends her free hours reading submissions for a literary agent. This story is Martine’s first publication in a literary magazine. Find her on Twitter @martine_krop.

Anthony Lawrence has published sixteen books of poems, the most recent being Headwaters (Pitt Street Poetry, 2016). He teaches Writing Poetry and Creative Writing at Griffith University, Gold Coast, and lives on the far north coast of NSW. This poem is the first section from Anthony’s verse novel, The Wild West.

Liam Lowth is a film student from Brisbane.

Ramon Loyola is a writer of poems, fiction and non-fiction. He lives in inner-Sydney’s Newtown.

Chris Lynch grew up in Papua New Guinea and is now based in Melbourne. His poetry has appeared in Cordite, Apex Magazine, Blackmail Press, IsletPeril Magazine, SpeedPoets, Stars Like Sand: Australian speculative poetry, and the 2015 Poetry & Place Anthology, among others. Currently working on his first collection of poetry, he blogs occasionally at www.chrislynch.com.au.

Megan McGrath is the author of the novella, Whale Station, and winner of the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Award. Her acclaimed short work is published in literary journals and anthologies including Griffith REVIEWMeanjin, Seizure, Tracks, Writing Queensland and Tincture Journal, among others. Follow Megan on Twitter @megansfictions or visit her website megansfictions.com.

Scott-Patrick Mitchell is a Perth-based performance poet who has recently taken to writing fiction. Visit facebook.com/scottpatrickmitchellpoet for more info.

David Murcott has had work published in Voiceworks, Eureka Street, Wet Ink, Brag Magazine, Page Seventeen and The Cannon’s Mouth (UK).

Elisabeth Murray is a writer from Sydney who is interested in all things feminist, queer, and mental health-related. Her work has been published in Verity La, Fields Magazine, Tincture Journal (Issue Seven), Contrapasso, Voiceworks, dotdotdash magazine, and several University of Sydney anthologies. Her novella, The Loud Earth, was published by Hologram in 2014.

a rawlings champions environmental stewardship through acoustic ecology, counter-mapping, and geopoetics. As a writer-activist, her literary output includes Wide slumber for lepidopterists (Coach House Books, 2006) and o w n (CUE BOOKS, 2015). Wide slumber received an Alcuin Award for Design; the book was adapted for stage production by VaVaVoom, Bedroom Community, and Valgeir Sigurðsson in 2014. She has also penned libretti for Davíð Brynjar Franzson (Longitude) and Gabrielle Herbst (Bodiless). Her music group Moss Moss Not Moss (with Rebecca Bruton) made its debut at the 2016 Glasgow Tectonics Music Festival.

Susan Bradley Smith began her professional writing life as a rock journalist but has also worked as a waitress and teacher. Her latest books are a novel-in-verse The Screaming Middle, the poetry collection Beds for all who come, and the memoir Friday Forever. An advocate for Arts and Health, Susan is the founder of the writing and wellbeing consultancy Milkwood Bibliotherapy, and Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at Curtin University. Her secret ambition is to swim every ocean pool in Australia without writing a book about it.

Christina Tang-Bernas lives in California with her extroverted husband and introverted cat. Her work has appeared in Vine Leaves Literary Journal, Still Points Arts Quarterly, WomenArts Quarterly Journal, and Kansas City Voices. Find out more at http://www.christinatangbernas.com.

Rachel Watts is a writer from Perth, Western Australia. She has been published in Island, Kill Your Darlings, The Big Issue and elsewhere. She reviews books and writes commentary at www.leatherboundpounds.com.

Ellie White holds a BA in English from The Ohio State University, and an MFA from Old Dominion University. She writes poetry and non-fiction. Her poems have been published in Antiphon Poetry Magazine, Harpur Palate, and several other journals. Ellie’s chapbook, Requiem for a Doll, was released by ELJ Publications in June 2015. She currently lives near some big rocks and trees outside Charlottesville, Virginia.

SB Wright was born in the town of Nhulunbuy in Arnhem Land, though most of his life has been spent in Alice Springs. A graduate of NTU he has spent his adult working life as a security guard, a martial arts instructor, a trainer in an international gaming company and as a secondary school teacher. His work has been published in Tincture Journal, INDaily Adelaide, Eureka StreetBluepepper, Writ Poetry Review and the anthologies The Stars Like Sand and Poetry & Place 2015.


Issue Fourteen

Tom Albert is a writer and performer based in Brisbane. His writing has appeared in Voiceworks, and in cabaret and comedy festivals across the east coast.

Jodi Cleghorn (@jodicleghorn) is a Brisbane-based author, editor, publisher and poet with a penchant for the dark vein of humanity. Jodi has had poetry and fiction published in Issues Three, Five, Eight, and Eleven of Tincture Journal.

Dave Drayton was a sauna enthusiast, recreational banjo player, and founding member of the Atterton Academy. In 2014 he was awarded the William Blake Prize for poetry. Dave’s poem ‘Motionless Chariot’ can be found in Issue Twelve of Tincture Journal and his non-fiction piece ‘Has Elton John Ever Performed at Macquarie Shopping Centre? Or, a Tiny Dancer Beneath the Ice Rink’ was published in Issue Three.

Denis Fitzpatrick has been writing for over thirty years and has been labelled ‘Sydney’s hippest writer’ and ‘the hippest of off-beat writers’ by the publishing house, Independence Jones (now, sadly, no longer in business). He is in a full remission with paranoid schizophrenia, and over the past several years has written almost exclusively about mental illness, from the point of view of those so affected. He is published monthly at The Short Stories Club, a blog run to promote new and emerging writers, and has several books available online. You can find him on Twitter @viearus.

Mark Frank lived in rural Japan for 12 years where he learned to love the rhythms of mountains and rivers. Currently he resides on an organic farm in Missouri with his wife and two young children.

Tee Indawongse is a current medical student at the University of Queensland, Australia. She has a passion for women’s health, but in her free time, has a powerful drive to write something worth reading. She has previously been published in Voiceworks and the anthology Incisors & Grinders, published by Monash Creative Writers.

Mark William Jackson’s work has appeared in various journals including Best Australian Poems, Popshot, Going Down SwingingCordite, Rabbit Poetry Journal and Verity La. Mark’s poems ‘Smalahove’ and ‘Man Alive, Number 5’ can be found in Issue Twelve and Issue Nine of Tincture Journal. For more information visit markwmjackson.com.

Joshua Kemp is an author of Australian Gothic fiction. He is currently completing his PhD at Edith Cowan University in Bunbury. His short stories have appeared in Overland and P3.

Rosanna Licari is an Australian writer and poet. She won the inaugural 2015 Philip Bacon Ekphrasis Award for her poem ‘The Wait’ after ‘Alligator Creek, Cairns’ by Ian Fairweather, 1939.

Regan Lynch is a Brisbane-based writer, theatre-maker and performer with a keen interest in spec-fic and queer fiction. His work has featured in AustLit and Semper Floreat, as well as coming Highly Commended in the SLQ Young Writers Award. www.reganlynch.com.

Megan McGrath is the author of the novella, Whale Station, and winner of the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Award. Her acclaimed short work is published in literary journals and anthologies including Griffith REVIEWMeanjin, Seizure, Tracks, Writing Queensland and Tincture Journal, among others. Follow Megan on Twitter @megansfictions or visit her website megansfictions.com.

Laura McPhee-Browne is a writer and social worker from Melbourne. She is currently working on what she hopes will be her first book, a collection of ‘homage’ or ‘echo’ stories inspired by the short fiction of her favourite female writers, the first of which can be read at Overlandhttps://overland.org.au/previous-issues/222-5-autumn-fiction/olam/. You can find her at lauramcpheebrowne.squarespace.com.

Craig Mills is based in Brisbane, but only because it has a better ring to it than Logan. He studied Creative Writing at QUT and was shortlisted for the QUT post-graduate writing prize in 2014. He has been published in Stilts and has spoken at Yarn: Stories Spun in Brisbane.

M.J. Mounsey is a writer from Sydney, Australia.

Kali Myers is a Perth-born, Melbourne-based writer, researcher, blogger and occasional ranter. Her work concerns violence, fairy tales, power, and representations of women. Her writing has previously appeared in Feminartsy, Overland online, and on a number of other blogs and scholarly journals. You can tweet to her @pickwickian36.

Anna Kerdijk Nicholson’s most recent book is Everyday Epic (2015). Her second book, Possession, received the 2010 Victorian Premier’s Prize and Wesley Michel Wright Prize.

BN Oakman’s poems have been published in many magazines, journals and newspapers both in Australia and overseas and recorded for ABC Classics. His most recent books are In Defence of Hawaiian Shirts (IP 2010) and Second Thoughts (IP 2014). He lives in Central Victoria. Once upon a time he was an academic economist. www.bnoakman.com.

Emily O’Grady is a PhD candidate at QUT. Her fiction and poetry have appeared in The Lifted Brow, Westerly, Mascara Literary Review, and Award Winning Australian Writing.

Nathanael O’Reilly was born in Warrnambool and raised in Ballarat, Brisbane and Shepparton; he currently resides in Texas. He is the author of Distance (2014) and the chapbooks Suburban Exile: American Poems (2011) and Symptoms of Homesickness (2010). Over one hundred of his poems have appeared in journals and anthologies around the world, including Antipodes, Australian Love PoemsBlackmail Press, Cordite, fourW, LiNQ, Mascara, Postcolonial TextProsopisia, Red River Review, Snorkel, Social Alternatives,Transnational Literature, Verity La, Writ Poetry Review and Windmills. Nathanael’s poems ‘A Glance, A Sigh’ and ‘Lost’ appeared in Issue Three and ‘Christian Girls’ and ‘I Was Not Like the Other Kids’ in Issue Six of Tincture Journal. An interview between our poetry editor Stuart Barnes and Nathanael O’Reilly can be found online: tincture-journal.com/2014/06/13/nathanael-oreilly-interviewed-by-stuart-barnes/.

Jonno Revanche is a writer, editor, multidisciplinary artist and unreasonably hard working capricorn originally from Adelaide, Australia. Their work has been featured in publications like I-D, Kill Your Darlings, Overland, Krass and Oyster.

Paul Threlfall is a writer and librarian based in Melbourne, Australia. He has won awards for three of his short stories, in the City of Boroondara, City of Greater Dandenong and University of Melbourne short story competitions. He has also had poetry published in Litmus Magazine.

Catherine Vidler’s first collection of poems Furious Triangle was published in 2011 by Puncher & Wattmann. She has a second collection forthcoming. Catherine’s poems have appeared in journals including Sport, Turbine, Blackbox Manifold, AntipodesTakahē and Southerly. Catherine is the editor of trans-Tasman literary magazine Snorkel (www.snorkel.org.au).

Deb Wain is a poet and short story writer who is passionate about the Australian environment. She has generally been employed in jobs where she talks for a living. When not writing or talking you can find Deb dancing in the garden, drinking coffee, or learning new things. (Deb is a current PhD candidate at Deakin University.)

Ben Walter is a Tasmanian writer of lyrical fiction and poetry. His writing has been widely published in Australian journals, including Meanjin, Island, Griffith Review and The Lifted Brow. He was the recent guest editor for Overland’s special anti-/dis-/un-Australian fiction issue. His stories ‘Teething’ and ‘City Fish’ can be found in Issue Two and Issue Seven of Tincture Journal.

Kim Waters is a Melbourne poet whose poetry has appeared in The Australian, Ulitarra and Hobo.


Issue Thirteen

Maria Arena began tinkering with the idea of being an author in her teens. This idea became a reality in 2006, when Hachette published her first novel, Mira Falling. After years of studying and teaching creative writing, Maria independently published her second novel Sisterhood in 2014, while seeking publication for a third novel and writing a fourth. In between teaching and writing novels, Maria plays around with short stories and co-runs an international short story writing competition at Field of Words.

J V Birch lives in South Australia. Her poems have appeared in anthologies, magazines and journals across the UK, Australia, Canada and the US, including The New Writer, Australian Love PoemsSotto, Uneven Floor and Transnational Literature. Her first collection is part of the Picaro Poets series published by Ginninderra Press. To find out more, visit www.jvbirch.wordpress.com.

Anne Lawrence Bradshaw was born and raised in the North of England. Her work has been recently published in Orbis, Acumen and Artemis (UK literary magazines) and dozens of e-zines. She lives a quiet life and treads lightly on the earth. When writing, however, she prefers to delve beneath the surface and seek out hidden anomalies, quiet monsters and the occasionally unexpected.

Elizabeth Caplice is an archivist on hiatus. Her work has been published in Meanjin, Overland, Feminartsy, The Lifted Brow, Frankie and Kill Your Darlings. She lives in Canberra. Follow Elizabeth on Twitter@hrasvelgveritas or read her blog at skybetweenbranches.wordpress.com.

Rebecca Douglas is an award-winning writer and reviewer from Adelaide, Australia. Her work has appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald, The Big Issue, ABC The Drum and a variety of other publications.

Jack Forbes is a 22-year-old writer living in the western suburbs of Melbourne. He recently completed an Arts degree at Monash University and hopes to continue writing while studying teaching in the future. In 2011 he was the national recipient of the Somerset Novella Writing Competition, and in 2012, a state finalist for Victoria.  He enjoys reading American ‘dirty realism’ and finds the works of Raymond Carver, Carson McCullers and Cormac McCarthy very inspiring. ‘Airport’ is his first published story in an Australian journal.

K. W. George is a writer from Brisbane. She is currently completing an MFA in Gothic Literature at the Queensland University of Technology, and was shortlisted for the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards Emerging Author / Unpublished Manuscript section.

Grace Heyer is an emerging writer and poet from rural NSW. Her work has appeared in Writ Poetry Review, Make Your Mark Magazine and Southerly Journal. Her short story ‘Sweetie’ was short-listed for the 2015 S. D. Harvey Short Story Award.

Susan Hawthorne is the author of seven collections of poems and two chapbooks as well as fiction and non-fiction books. Her latest book is Lupa and Lamb (2014). Her collection Cow (2011) was shortlisted for the 2012 Kenneth Slessor Poetry Prize and Earth’s Breath for the 2010 Judith Wright Poetry Prize.

Rose Hunter is the author of the poetry books You As Poetry (Texture Press), [four paths] (Texture Press), and to the river (Artistically Declined Press), as well as the chapbook descansos (dancing girl press). She is from Australia originally, lived in Canada for ten years, and now spends a lot of time in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. More information about her is available at Whoever Brought Me Here Will Have To Take Me Home.

Anna Jacobson is a Brisbane poet, writer and artist. In 2015 she was shortlisted for the Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize for an Unpublished Manuscript. She graduated from Creative Writing at QUT in 2015. Her poetry has been published in literary journals including Cordite, Rabbit and Australian Poetry Journal. Her website is www.annajacobson.com.au.

Rebecca Jessen lives in Toowoomba with her two cacti. She is the award-winning author of verse novel Gap (UQP 2014). Rebecca is the winner of the 2015 QLD Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Award. In 2013 Rebecca won the Queensland Literary Award for Best Emerging Author. Rebecca’s writing has been published in The Lifted BrowCordite Poetry Review, Mascara Literary Review, Verity LaVoiceworks and more. Rebecca blogs at becjessen.wordpress.com. Rebecca’s creative non-fiction piece ‘Firth Avenue’ appeared in Issue Twelve of Tincture Journal.

Magda Kapa was born in Greece and now lives in northern Germany. She has worked as a freelance screenwriter and Modern Greek and English teacher. Her first poetry collection All the Words was published earlier this year by Phoenicia Publishing. She is also a photographer who shoots in film. She blogs at notborninenglish.wordpress.com and tweets as @MagdaKapa.

Philip Keenan is a writer from Sydney who is interested in the strangeness of familiar things. He has a blog called Johan Turdenmeier’s Miscellany and he tweets @Turdenmeier. Philip’s story ‘Cubans’ was published in Issue Seven of Tincture Journal.

Wayne Marshall is an Australian writer and musician. He lives in the town of Bacchus Marsh with his wife and two daughters.

Megan McGrath is the author of the novella, Whale Station, and winner of the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Award. Her acclaimed short work is published in literary journals and anthologies including Griffith REVIEW, Meanjin, Seizure, Tracks, Writing Queensland and Tincture Journal, among others. Follow Megan on Twitter @megansfictions or visit her website megansfictions.com.

Peter Papathanasiou was born in a small village in northern Greece and adopted as a baby to an Australian family. His writing has been published by Fairfax Media, News Corporation, The PigeonholeCaught by the River, 3:AM Magazine, Litro, Going Down Swinging, and Visual Verse, and reviewed by The Times Literary Supplement and The Huffington Post. He has been profiled as a feature writer in Neos Kosmos and is represented by Rogers, Coleridge & White literary agency in London. He divides his time between Australia, London, and a small village in northern Greece. He tweets @peteplastic.

Kaylia Payne has always been an avid reader and, as avid readers tend to do, decided to start writing her own rambling adventures. Her passions are short stories and strongly-worded opinion pieces, the latter of which she gets to do often as a regular writer for both HerCanberra and Lip Magazine. She has also been featured on Mamamia. For short fiction, Kaylia received a commendation award in 2011 for the Katherine Susannah Prichard Speculative Fiction Award, and has since had short stories published in Tincture Journal, Narrator, and the annual fourW anthology. Kaylia’s story ‘One Big Apology’ appeared in Issue Four of Tincture Journal.

Anna Ryan-Punch is a Melbourne poet and critic. Her previous publications include poetry in Westerly, Antipodes, The AgeIsland, Overland, Southerly, and the new anthology Prayers of a Secular World. Her poem ‘Newborn’ appeared in Issue Four and her story ‘Only After School’ in Issue Six of Tincture Journal.

Dan Ryder is a poet from Doncaster, England working towards a Creative Writing MA from the Manchester Writing School. He currently lives in Melbourne and is a poetry editor at Voiceworks.

Deborah Sheldon is a professional writer living in Melbourne, Australia. Her short fiction has appeared in many well-regarded magazines such as Aurealis, Tincture JournalMidnight Echo, Island, Pulp Modern, and [untitled], and also in various anthologies. Her latest releases are the crime-noir novella Dark Waters (Cohesion Press 2014) and Mayhem: selected stories (Satalyte Publishing 2015). She has two novels due for publication in 2016: the bio-horror action-adventure, Devil Dragon; and the contemporary crime-thriller, Garland Cove Heist. Other writing credits include commercial television scripts such as Neighbours, stage plays, magazine articles, award-winning medical writing, and non-fiction books for Reed Books and Random House. Deborah’s stories ‘Ducklings’ and ‘Crazy Town is a Happy Place’ appeared in Issues Two and Eight of Tincture Journal. Visit her at http://deborahsheldon.wordpress.com.

David Stavanger is an award winning poet, writer, and cultural producer. In 2013 he won the Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize, resulting in the release of The Special (UQP), his first full-length collection of poetry which was also awarded the 2015 Wesley Michel Wright Prize. At the 2014 Queensland Literary Awards he received a Queensland Writing Fellowship to develop his next two collections. David is also the Co-Director of the Queensland Poetry Festival. He is sometimes known as pioneering Green Room-nominated ‘spoken weird’ artist Ghostboy, performing solo, with multi-instrumentalist Richard Grantham, and previously with the band Golden Virtues at festivals across Australia. David’s poem ‘Natural Assets, Law 2003’ appeared in Issue Twelve of Tincture Journal.

Mark Ward is a poet from Dublin, Ireland. He was the 2015 Poet Laureate for Glitterwolf and his work has appeared in Assaracus, Storm Cellar, The Good Men Project, Off The Rocks, The Wild Ones, Emerge and the anthologies, Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed, The Myriad Carnival and Not Just Another Pretty Face. He has recently completed work on his first chapbook, How to Live When Life Subtracts and is currently working on a novel-in-verse called Circumference, from which this poem is taken. astintinyourspotlight.wordpress.com.

Alison Whittaker is a Gomeroi poet and essayist from the floodplain fringe of north-western New South Wales. She now lives in Sydney on Wangal land, studying and working in media law and Aboriginal women’s law and policy. Alison has written for Meanjin, Vertigo and Colouring the Rainbow: Blak Queer and Trans Perspectives. Her debut poetry collection Lemons in the Chicken Wire, winner of the State Library of Queensland’s 2015 black&write! Fellowship, will be released on March 1.

Ellin Williams is a Sydney based writer, visual artist and aspiring actor. Her writing has appeared in SoutherlyAustralian Geographic online and several art books. She works in the television and book industries.


Issue Twelve

Karen Andrews is an award-winning writer of both short stories and poetry, author, editor and publisher. Her work has appeared in many publications throughout the country. Her blog (www.karenandrews.com.au) is a two-time finalist in the Best Australian Blogs competition and she regularly conducts workshops on the subject. She lives in Melbourne and can be found on Twitter @KarenAndrewsAU.

Lech Blaine is twenty-three. He runs a motel in Bundaberg. He’s been published by Scum, Seizure, Stilts, theNewerYork and Voiceworks. You can read more stories at his website: www.lechblaine.com.

Seabird Brooks lives, surfs, writes and works on the South Coast of NSW, usually in that order. Over the last few years his fiction has appeared in a number of publications, both literary and otherwise. He is currently undertaking postgraduate studies at the University of Wollongong. Seabird’s story ‘Between the Line’ appeared in Issue Seven of Tincture Journal.

Katerina Bryant is a writer, editor and law student based in Adelaide, Australia. Her work has appeared in journals such as Voiceworks, Overland (online) and the Meanjin blog. She tweets at @katerina_bry.

Shannon Burns is an Adelaide-based writer, reviewer/critic and sometimes-academic. He has written for Australian Book Review, Sydney Review of Books and Music & Literature and is a member of the J.M. Coetzee Centre for Creative Practice. He won the 2009 Adelaide Review Prize for Short Fiction and the 2015 Salisbury Writers’ Festival Short Story Prize. He has published fiction in various places, including Wet Ink, Etchings, Mascara Literary Review, Overland and Verity La, and is currently working on a biography of the writer Gerald Murnane.

Chloë Callistemon is a photographer, filmmaker and writer. Her poetry and multimedia have been published in journals and anthologies in Australia and internationally including Cordite, The Australian Poetry Journal and Australian Love Poems. She has been shortlisted for the Second Bite Poetry Competition and the Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Prize. Chloë’s poem ‘A Bird’s Guide to Flight – Abstract’ appeared in Issue Three of Tincture Journal.

Born in Singapore but a global citizen, Joyce Chng writes mainly science fiction (SFF) and YA fiction. She likes steampunk and tales of transformation/transfiguration. Her fiction has appeared in The Apex Book of World SF Vol II, Cranky Ladies of History, Accessing The Future and We See A Different Frontier. Her urban fantasy set in Singapore is contracted under Fox Spirit Books. She can be found at A Wolf’s Tale (http://awolfstale.wordpress.com). She tweets too@jolantru.

Natalie D-Napoleon was “born sandy devotional”, having been raised on a farm on the outskirts of Perth, Western Australia. For twenty years she has toured and performed as a singer-songwriter. Currently, she is working as a writing tutor while completing a Master’s in Writing. This poem is part of a full-length book erasure project titled The Sands of My Life, an erasure of Emily Wright’s book of the same title.

Benjamin Dodds is the author of Regulator (Puncher & Wattmann Poetry, 2014). His work has appeared in Best Australian Poems 2014Antipodes: Poetic Responses, Stars Like Sand: Australian Speculative Poetry and on Radio National’s Poetica program. His current project is a verse novel exploring the ethical and personal boundaries of scientific research.

Dave Drayton was the author of Poetic Pentagons (Spacecraft Press), Threnodials (Prism) and other works. He was a PhD candidate at the University of Technology Sydney, founding member of the Atterton Academy, sauna enthusiast, and 2014 recipient of the Blake Prize for Poetry.

Zahid Gamieldien is a writer, tutor and former lawyer. In 2015, his fiction has been accepted for publication in Overland, Mascara Literary Review, Bahamut Journal and Pantheon Magazine.

Phillip Hall is an essayist and poet working as an editor with Verity La’s Emerging Indigenous Writers’ Project. In 2014 he published Sweetened in Coals. He is currently working on a collection of place-based poetry called Fume. This project celebrates, and responds to, Indigenous Culture in the Northern Territory’s Gulf of Carpentaria. In November 2015 Black Rune Press will publish a chapbook of Phillip’s collaborative work with Diwurruwurru: The Borroloola Poetry Club.

Craig Hildebrand-Burke is a writer and teacher from Melbourne.

Kate Iselin is a Melbourne-born, Sydney-based writer. Her work has appeared in Daily Life, Kill Your Darlings, Archer, Spook and The Guardian. Her blog, Thirty Dates of Tinder (thirtydatesoftinder.tumblr.com), explores her adventures in the world of online dating.

Mark William Jackson’s work has appeared in various journals including Best Australian Poems 2011, Popshot, Going Down Swinging, Cordite, Rabbit Poetry Journal, Verity La and Tincture Journal. For more information visit http://markwmjackson.com.

Gareth Jenkins is an independent researcher, poet, artist and community development facilitator. His theoretical work focuses on avant-garde artists and writers that have experienced schizophrenia, and he has presented his research in Australia, Europe and the USA. He has lectured widely at Australian Universities on the history and practice experimental art and literature. Gareth is a hybrid-media artist and his creative work includes poetry, visual art, digital media and installation. His work has appeared in numerous domestic and international publications including Cordite Poetry Review, Rattapallax, The Drunken Boat, Rabbit Poetry Journal, Mascara Literary Review, The Last Vispo Anthology and VLAK: Contemporary Poetics and the Arts. Much of his work can be found at: apothecaryarchive.com.

Rebecca Jessen lives in Toowoomba with her two cacti. She is the award-winning author of verse-novel Gap (UQP 2014). Rebecca is the winner of the 2015 Queensland Premier’s Young Publishers and Writers Award. In 2013 Rebecca won the Queensland Literary Award for Best Emerging Author. In 2012 she won the State Library of Queensland Young Writers Award. Rebecca’s writing has been published in The Lifted Brow, Cordite Poetry Review, Mascara Literary Review, Verity La, Voiceworks, Stilts and Scum Mag.

Chance Lee is writing a collection of personal essays exploring video games, mental illness, and sexuality. His writing has appeared on The Rumpus, Every Day Fiction and in Best Gay Erotica 2014 (as Lee Hitt). He has an M.A. in Creative Writing from Southern New Hampshire University and currently lives in New Hampshire. You can find him online at http://chancelee.com, @_mrchance and https://facebook.com/chanceleewriter.

Eva Lomski’s work has appeared in the anthology Lost Boy and Other Stories and in journals including The Best Australian Stories, The Sleepers Almanac, Cleaver Magazine and Island, and is forthcoming in Glimmer Train. She placed third in the 2013 Lorian Hemingway Short Story Competition and has been shortlisted several times for the Fish Publishing Short Story Prize. She’s a past recipient of the Grace Marion Wilson Mentorship for Fiction from Writers Victoria and was recently was awarded a Publisher Introduction Program Fellowship by Varuna Australia.

Angela Meyer is the author of Captives (Inkerman & Blunt). Her creative work has been published widely, including in Best Australian Stories 2014, The Lifted Brow, Island, Wet Ink, Cordite and Seizure. She has also published reviews, essays and articles. She works as a commissioning editor for Echo Publishing. literaryminded.com.au / @LiteraryMinded. Angela’s flash fiction pieces ‘Apocalypse’ and ‘Glitch’ can be found in Issue One of Tincture Journal.

Joe Nuttall is an ex-Tasmanian writer and musician, currently residing at the dark end of Brunswick, Melbourne. His passions include the weird fiction of Lovecraft, Barker, Jack Ketchum, Sichuan food and more indie bands than can be listed here. His publication history includes Verity La and The Review of Australian Fiction (with Steven Gerlich).

Sevana Ohandjanian is a writer, music critic and film programmer. She has read at events like God Ate My Google Drive and the National Young Writers’ Festival, and has been published in The Suburban Review, Stereo Stories and Shabby Doll House. She curates a small literary zine called Still Life.

Adam Ouston is a writer living in Hobart, Tasmania. His work has appeared in places such as The Canary Press, Southerly, Island Magazine, Voiceworks, Crikey, The Lifted Brow, The Review of Australian Fiction, and the 2014 Transportation anthology. He is the recipient of the 2014 Erica Bell Literary Award for his manuscript The Party, which has also been shortlisted for the 2015 University of Tasmania Prize. He tries to maintain a blog at http://adam-ouston.tumblr.com.

Jane Rawson is the author of the novel A wrong turn at the Office of Unmade Lists, the novella Formaldehyde and the non-fiction guide to surviving climate change, The Handbook. Her short fiction has been published in Sleepers Almanac and Overland. She blogs at http://janebryonyrawson.wordpress.com and tweets as @frippet.

Gabrielle Reid lives in the bit of Australia where the council sends warning letters about kangaroo attacks. When she’s not writing, she works as a high school teacher or hangs out at home with her two young children. Gabrielle can be found online at www.justkeepreiding.com or on Twitter @reidwriting.

Edith Speers was born in Canada then emigrated to Australia after university. Her poetry and short stories have won many awards and publications. Her poetry has appeared in all the major Australian literary magazines and many anthologies, as well as several Canadian and American journals. She is the author of two published collections of poetry and others awaiting publication. Since 1997 she has also published other Australian writers as proprietor of Esperance Press.

David Stavanger is an award winning poet, writer, and cultural producer. In 2013 he won the Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize, resulting in the release of The Special (UQP), his first full-length collection of poetry, and at the 2014 Queensland Literary Awards he was awarded a Queensland Writing Fellowship to develop his next two collections. David is also the Co-Director of the Queensland Poetry Festival. He is sometimes known as pioneering Green Room-nominated ‘spoken weird’ artist Ghostboy, performing solo, with multi-instrumentalist Richard Grantham, and with the band Golden Virtues at festivals across Australia. Ghostboy established the thriving Queensland poetry slam scene via his program work with the State Library of Queensland and Woodford Folk Festival.


Issue Eleven

Magdalena Ball runs The Compulsive Reader (www.compulsivereader.com). She is the author of the novels Black Cow and Sleep Before Evening, poetry books Repulsion Thrust and Quark Soup, and has been widely published in journals, anthologies, and literary magazines, including Cordite, Bluepepper, The WesterlyEscape Velocity, Silver Birch Press, and The Lake to name a few. Find out more about Magdalena at www.magdalenaball.com.

Lisa Brockwell lives on a rural property near Byron Bay, on the north coast of NSW, with her husband and young son. She has been shortlisted for the Newcastle, the University of Canberra, the Australian Catholic University and the Montreal International poetry prizes and highly commended in the Bridport Prize (UK). Her poems have appeared in The Spectator, Australian Love Poems, Eureka Street and Best Australian Poems (2014). Her first collection, Earth Girls, will be published by Pitt Street Poetry in 2016.

Jodi Cleghorn (@jodicleghorn) is a Brisbane-based author, editor, publisher and poet with a penchant for the dark vein of humanity.

Recent poetry by Rico Craig can be found in Meanjin, Cordite, Verity La, and Doctor T.J Eckleburg Review. In 2014 he was shortlisted for the University of Canberra Poetry Prize and the Newcastle Poetry Prize. His poem ‘Angelo’ was awarded third prize in the 2014 Dorothy Porter prize by Meanjin.

Kate Elkington is a Queensland writer completing a Doctor of Creative Arts (Creative Writing) at the University of the Sunshine Coast examining the composite novel in Australian literature. Her recent fiction has been published in The Best Australian Stories 2014, Meanjin, Westerly, Kill Your Darlings, TEXT Journal and The Big Issue.

Katelin Farnsworth is a writer from Melbourne. She has been published by Voiceworks, Offset, SPM Publications, Writers Bloc, Spineless Wonders, and others. She is currently working on her first novel and recently won the Rachel Funari Prize for Fiction 2015. She loves both Sydney and Melbourne. Katelin’s story ‘Simmering’ appeared in Issue Eight of Tincture Journal.

Tristan Foster is a writer from Sydney. His writing has most recently been published in Gorse, Music & Literature, The Stockholm Review of Fiction and Black Sun Lit. He is also a reviews/nonfiction editor at 3:AM Magazine.

Melissa Goode is an Australian writer living in the Blue Mountains, just outside of Sydney. Her work has appeared in Best Australian Short Stories, Fiction DeskCrannóg, Pithead Chapel, Bang! and Halfway Down the Stairs, among others. One of her short stories has been made into a film by the production company, Jungleboys. She is currently writing her first novel.

Kathryn Hummel writes non-fiction, fiction and poetry, sometimes combined with her original photography. Her diverse work has been published and performed throughout Australia, New Zealand, the US, and Eastern, Western and Southern Asia; her debut collection Poems From Here (Walleah Press) was published in 2014. More details available at kathrynhummel.com. Kathryn’s non-fiction piece, ‘A Night Inside’, was published in Issue Eight of Tincture Journal.

Heather Taylor Johnson is poetry editor of Transnational Literature and the author of three books of poetry and one novel. Her fourth book of poetry is soon to be published by Five Islands Press.

B.J. Jones writes about rogue pharmacists, phantom-limbed windmills, quidnuncs, Luciferian calories, amorous bowling shoes, Funkhousers, martyred coupons, Nietzschian wire hangers, invisible tomatoes, and pen-clicking adversaries while living in Dubuque, IA with his wife. Some of it even gets published.

Rory Kennett-Lister is a writer of fiction, creative non-fiction and essays. His work has been featured in Seizure, The Lifted Brow, Overland, Scum Magazine, the Australian Book Review and others. A selection of his writing can be found at rorykennettlister.com.

Stephen Koster developed a third arm while on vacation to the Bahamas. He hopes this new arm will write better cursive than the other two and won’t get caught on coat racks or in between revolving doors. Stephen has had stories published in Issue Six and Issue Eight of Tincture Journal. Follow his third arm at facebook.com/stephenkosterwriter.

Cindy Matthews has worked as a chamber maid, potato peeler, data entry operator, teacher, and vice-principal of special education programs. She writes, paints, and instructs online courses for teachers in Bruce County, Ontario, Canada. Her fiction and non-fiction have appeared in many literary journals. She is a frequent book reviewer for Prick of the Spindle and Professionally Speaking. ‘Ringo’ was awarded third prize in the category of Creative Non-Fiction at the 2015 Northwestern Ontario Writers Workshop Writing Contest. Her creative non-fiction piece ‘Nothing by Mouth’ was shortlisted in the 2014 Event Magazine Non-Fiction Contest and published in Issue Nine of Tincture Journal. Find her work at cindymatthews.ca.

Justin Lowe was born in Sydney but spent significant portions of his childhood on the Spanish island of Minorca with his younger sister and artist mother. He developed a penchant for writing poetry while penning lyrics for a succession of bands both successful and not so, and has since been published all over the world. Justin currently resides in a house called “Doug” in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney where he edits the poetry blog Bluepepper (http://bluepepper.blogspot.com.au/).

Ariella Van Luyn is a writer, researcher and teacher living in Townsville, North Queensland. Her fiction has appeared in Voiceworks, The Lifted Brow, Overland and Lip Magazine.

Daniel Lynch is a writer, living in Brisbane, Queensland. His short fiction can be found in REX, Stilts, Cow Hide Journal, and Fiction Vortex. He has twice been shortlisted for the QUT Postgraduate Writing Prize and is a regular speaker at Yarn Storytelling. He is currently completing a PhD because it is a qualification he can spell.

Gemma Mahadeo emigrated to Australia from the UK in 1987. She has lived in the Philippines, and spent most of her time in Melbourne. Her work has appeared in local and national journals, in print and online. Most recent work includes a villanelle in Writ Poetry Review, and a sonnet in the Pozible-funded Tenderness Journal. She once gave the New Zealand brewers of Yeastie Boys fame a beer poem whilst they were all stuck on a tram together.

Laura McPhee-Browne is a social worker who writes short stories. She hails from Melbourne, Australia and currently lives in Toronto, Canada. Most of her published work can be found on her website: https://lauramcpheebrowne.squarespace.com.

Jemma Payne is a university student living in Wollongong. She loves roller skating and crocheting hats. Her poetry has been published in Voiceworks magazine, and her short fiction was part of the Voiceworks 100th issue alumni-edited edition.

T.J. Robinson is a writer and editor living in Melbourne. He is editor-in-chief of The Suburban Review and in 2010 he won the Grace Marion Wilson Emerging Writers Competition. He is currently working on a novella about love, eggs and immaculate conception.

Brian Rowe is currently working toward his MFA in Creative Writing at the University of Nevada, Reno. His short fiction has been published in Dreamspinner Press, Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, Fox Cry Review, and Saturday Night Reader, and he recently won the UNR Graduate Student Award for Outstanding Creative Writer.

Omar J. Sakr is an Arab Australian poet whose poetry has featured in MeanjinOverland, Cordite Poetry Review and Carve Magazine, among others. His work has been translated into Arabic by Mohammed Al-Asaad and published by Najwan Darwish. Most recently, he was shortlisted for the Judith Wright Poetry Prize for New and Emerging Poets.

Ally Scale’s recent work has been published in Right Now, Ricochet Magazine and Spineless Wonders. She has just returned to Melbourne from Perth where she was a writer in residence for the Fellowship of Australian Writers Western Australia (FAWWA).

Danielle Spinks is a regular freelance writer of fiction and non-fiction. Her work has appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald, Highlife Magazine, and Regime Books. She has had three plays performed and is currently writing her first novel.

Kailash Srinivasan has a Masters in Writing from Macquarie University, Sydney. His first book, What Happened to That Love, was published in 2010. His work has appeared in Sincere Forms of Flattery (O&S Publishing), Urban Shots Love Collection, Yuva (GreyOak), Chicken Soup Books, and literary magazines like Oxford Magazine, Crate (US), Going Down Swinging, Regime (Australia), Bluslate, and Them Pretentious Basterds (India).

Sam van Zweden is a Melbourne-based writer of poetry and creative nonfiction.


Issue Ten

Benjamin Allmon’s work has most recently appeared in The Writers Bloc, The Writer Magazine, Punchnel’s Magazine and Aurealis. When not writing he makes up songs that involve pigs so that his two-year-old son can make oinking noises.

When not writing fiction, Elizabeth Corbett works as a librarian, contributes articles and reviews to the Historical Novels Review, blogs at elizabethjanecorbett.com and teaches Welsh at the Celtic Club in Melbourne. In 2009, her short story ‘Beyond the Blackout Curtain’ won the Bristol Short Story Prize. Another story, ‘Silent Night’, was short listed for the Allan Marshall Short Story Prize. She is currently working on what she hopes will be the final drafts of a historical novel: The Tides Between—a journey towards wonder, womanhood and the words by which we make sense of life.

Rebecca Dempsey is a Melbourne writer. Her short stories have appeared in publications around the world. She blogs at writingbec.wordpress.com.

Kim Farleigh has worked for aid agencies in three conflicts: Kosovo, Iraq and Palestine. He takes risks to get the experience required for writing. He likes fine wine, art, photography and bullfighting, which probably explains why this Australian from Perth lives in Madrid; although he wouldn’t say no to living in a French château. 120 of his stories have been accepted by 78 different magazines.

Julie Janson works as a novelist, playwright and visual artist, in Sydney, Darwin and internationally. She grew up on the Lane Cove river in Boronia Park. She is a descendant of the Burruberongal people of the Darug Aboriginal nation, Hawkesbury river. Julie has had plays performed at Belvoir St Theatre Sydney and has been shortlisted for the Patrick White Award and the Griffin Award. Her plays Black Mary and Gunjies have been published by Aboriginal Studies Press. Julie’s first novel, The Crocodile Hotel, was published by Cyclops Press in March 2015. www.cyclopspress.com.au. www.juliejansonwriter.com.

Jenn Johnson lives in the desert in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. She has been writing for most of her life as way to try to make sense of the world around her. She’s still working on it. Her writing has appeared in The Island Tides and Silver Apples Magazine.

Tiggy Johnson is an Australian poet whose poems have appeared widely in Australian journals and anthologies, including Black Inc’s Best Australian Poems 2012. Her poetry collection First taste was published in 2010 and That zero year, co-written with Andrew Phillips, in 2012. Tiggy’s work has previously appeared in Issues Three, Six and Seven of Tincture Journal.

Chido Muchemwa is a student in the MFA program at the University of Wyoming, concentrating on non-fiction. She grew up in Zimbabwe and has been living in America for the last six years. Follow her work at https://curiouschido.wordpress.com/.

Lee Todd Lacks is a mixed-media artist, music therapist, and clinical counsellor who seeks to blur the distinctions between rants, chants, anecdotes, and anthems. His experience of living with significant vision and hearing deficits often informs his writing, which has appeared in The Alembic, Clockwise Cat, and Queen’s Head and Artichoke. He resides in South Portland, Maine, USA, where he lives happily with his wife and young son.

Hunter Liguore is an American writer who holds degrees in history and writing. A long-time naturalist and activist, she has written on a variety of topics that promote compassionate awareness towards the environment, indigenous rights, and endangered species. She’s been named the 2015 Writer-in-Residence at the Edwin Way Teale Nature Preserve. She teaches undergraduate and graduate writing in New England, and offers nature-writing classes online. Her novel, Next Breath, is represented by Regal Literary Agency. HunterLiguore.com.

Chris Lynch is a Brisbane-based writer and teacher. His poetry has appeared in Apex Magazine, Blackmail Press, Brisbane New Voices II, Islet, page seventeen, SpeedPoets, Stars Like Sand: Australian Speculative Poetry, and the Jean Cecily Drake-Brockman Poetry Prize 2013 Anthology, among others. He blogs occasionally at www.chrislynch.com.au.

Julie Maclean is the author of Kiss of the Viking (Poetry Salzburg), When I saw Jimi (Indigo Dreams) and the e-chapbook You Love You Leave (Kind of a Hurricane Press, US). Her poetry and short fiction appears in The Best Australian Poetry (UQP) and is forthcoming in Poetry. Julie blogs at www.juliemacleanwriter.com.

Frank Martinicchio is a Melbourne-based aspiring writer. He has developed his craft while studying an Associate Degree of Professional Writing and Editing at RMIT University.

Matthew Mastricova is an airline menu writer from New Jersey. He has work forthcoming in WhiskeyPaper. He is an editor at www.thudsandrumbles.com, where he talks too much about electronic music.

Carly-Jay Metcalfe is a Brisbane based writer and death midwife. Carly-Jay is one of six poets in Bend River Mountain, which will be published by Regime Books later this year. Her website can be found at www.carlyjaymetcalfe.com and her blog is www.bruisesyoucantouch.com.

Kathryn Morgan is a writer and teacher based in Sydney, currently writing a novel. Kathryn’s writing interests include social and cultural change, linguistics, social justice and South East Asia. Her short stories and poetry have been published in UTS Writers’ Anthologies, Gang Re:public Indonesia-Australia Creative Adventures, Sydney University Anthology, Ricecooker, Honi Soi and Vertigo.

Mary Petralia is currently enrolled in the MFA Program at the University of Central Florida, where she was twice-nominated for the AWP Intro Journals Project. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Anamesa: An Interdisciplinary Journal, Hitherto: The MUIC Literary Journal, Ishaan Literary Review, Kentucky Review, 99 Pine Street, and other publications. When she was two years old, her family decided to move from New York to either Melbourne, Australia or Melbourne, Florida. They chose Florida, where she continues to live on the east coast with her family whilst dreaming of her long lost Australian analogue.

Emma Rayward has recently completed her creative honours thesis titled Topology of Abject Bodies. She is interested in holes and surfaces and things moving through holes to reach surfaces.

Robin Reich lives in Ulladulla, NSW and is a trained primary school teacher. He considers writing thusly: analogous to the task of an animator from the 1940s transferring hand-executed artwork from paper to animation cells, thousands and thousands and thousands of times, producing great depth. He believes his desire to publish writing is purely ego-driven. His first published work was ‘The Trout’, which can be found in Issue Seven of Tincture Journal.

Paul Williams has published short fiction in Meanjin, Social Alternatives (AUS), Chicago Quarterly Review (USA), New Writing (UK), and New Contrast (South Africa). He has also published Young Adult novels (Parallax, Loverboy, Secret of Old Mukiwa), a memoir (Soldier Blue), a literary novel (Cokcraco) and has won several awards for his fiction. He teaches Creative Writing at the University of the Sunshine Coast.

Yi Yu, originally from China, writes in English and Chinese. She started writing poetry in English from summer 2012.


Issue Nine

Cathy Adams was recently nominated for a 2015 Pushcart Prize for her short story, “Asphalt Chiefs”. Her first novel, This Is What It Smells Like, was published by New Libri Press, Washington, and she has been published in Utne, A River and Sound Review, Upstreet, Portland Review, Steel Toe Review and Cha: An Asian Literary Journal, among others. She earned her MFA in Creative Writing from Pacific Lutheran University’s Rainier Writing Workshop and now lives and writes in Xinzheng, China.

Anne Elvey is the author of Kin (Five Islands, 2014) and three poetry chapbooks. Anne is managing editor of Plumwood Mountain: An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics. She holds honorary appointments at Monash University and University of Divinity, Melbourne. http://anneelvey.wordpress.com.

Tayne Ephraim studied creative writing at UOW. Originally from Wollongong, he now lives in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. His work has appeared in Voiceworks, The Suburban Review, Scum MagSeizure and Stilts.

Ramon Glazov is a civilizing force that demands respect. His pieces have appeared in Overland, The Monthly, Jacobin, NSFWCorp and The eXiled. He lives between Perth and Italy.

Ica (Veronika) Gvozdeva is a Russian-born bilingual Medieval Studies major on the verge of graduating from Sydney University with a dubiously useful headful of asceticism and mysticism. Perhaps she’ll go off to get qualified as a translator, or an industrial abseiler next. In the meantime she writes short fiction and even shorter poems, and makes ends meet through modelling for life drawing, tutoring English students and warehouse work. In her spare time she endeavours to get under the city’s skin via forays into urban exploration, goes rock climbing and dabbles in drawing and sculpture.

Jonathan Hadwen is a Brisbane writer whose poetry has been published in Westerly, fourW, and Stand Magazine, as well as other publications in Australia and overseas. In 2013 he was named runner-up in the Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize for an unpublished manuscript, and was commended again in 2014. In 2014 he also placed second in the Josephine Ulrick Prize.

Matt Hetherington is a writer, music-maker, gourmet Indian chef, soccer nut, bludger, and lover based in Brisbane. His first collection of all-Japanese-related forms (and fourth poetry collection) is For Instance, published by Mulla Mulla Press. Some current inspirations are: Timbaland, Frisky Dingo, Jess, Luce, and northern sunshine. Matt’s latest published poetry can be found in a three-way collaboration with poets Ryan Van Winkle and David Stavanger here: http://ryanvanwinkle.com/projects/commiserate-2015/.

Mark William Jackson’s work has appeared in various print and online journals including: Best Australian Poems 2011, Popshot (UK), Going Down Swinging, Cordite, Rabbit Poetry Journal and SpeedPoets. For more information visit http://markwmjackson.com.

Miodrag Kojadinović is a Canadian-Serbian (dual citizen) poet, prose writer, journalist, translator, interpreter, and photographer. He has undergraduate degrees from Serbia and Canada, postgraduate ones from Serbia, Holland, the US, and Hungary, and has worked at universities in Norway, Mainland China, Holland, and Serbia, and a college in Macau. His writing in a wide range of genres has been published in ten languages in Canada, Serbia, the US, France, Russia, England, Holland, Spain, Slovenia, India, Scotland, Macau, Mainland China, Croatia, Australia, Germany, Montenegro and Austria. His photography was exhibited in galleries in, and published in journals from, North America, Europe and Asia. He has also appeared in three documentaries and an episode of a TV series.

Sean Lynch is a poet from New Jersey who was born in 1992. Lynch’s first book of poetry the city of your mind was published in 2013 by Whirlwind Press. Frank Sherlock, the poet laureate of Philadelphia, called Lynch’s debut poetry collection “visionary”. S.W. Lynch’s writing has been featured in numerous publications online and in print, including APIARY, Poetry Quarterly, and the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Nick Marland is an award-winning writer of fiction and non-fiction who has appeared in Going Down Swinging, The Lifted Brow, Seizure, Griffith REVIEW,Voiceworks, Stories of Sydney, the UTS Writers’ Anthology and online at ABC’s The Drum. He once tripped up Woody Allen and spent three days as an illegal alien in Belarus.

Amelia Marshall is a journalist based in Sydney. She recently completed a masters in creative writing at UTS and works as a journalist at Triple J news.

Cindy Matthews has worked as a chamber maid, potato peeler, data entry operator, teacher, and vice-principal of special education programs. She writes, paints, and instructs online courses for teachers in Bruce County, Ontario, Canada. Her fiction and non-fiction have appeared or are forthcoming in Story and Picture, The BohemythSeverine Literary Journal, Pure Slush, Ascent Aspirations, The Belle Journal, Steel Chisel, Rural Voice, Ricochet Magazine, Crab Fat Literary Magazine, Green Hills Literary Lantern, Gamblers Mag and Rhubarb Magazine. She is a frequent book reviewer for Prick of the Spindle and Professionally Speaking. This creative non-fiction piece, “Nothing by Mouth”, was shortlisted in the 2014 Event Magazine Non-Fiction Contest. Find her work at http://cindymatthews.ca.

Laura McPhee-Browne is a writer and social worker who hails from Melbourne, and currently lives in Toronto. You can find her on Twitter @laurahelenmb, or on her fledgling blog, www.lauramcpheebrowne.com.

Jeff Meisner lives in the Pacific Northwest of the United States with his wife and son. He is a former newspaper reporter and magazine journalist and currently works in digital marketing at a global technology company. The prequel to this story, “Children Without Faces”, appeared in Issue Seven of Tincture Journal.

Bastian Fox Phelan is a queer and transgender writer and zine maker exploring the process of discovering and creating identity through music, internet, relationships and place. Bastian has self-published a number of popular zines including Ladybeard and Thank You For Your Love. Bastian’s essays and memoir writing have been published in online and print magazines in Australia and the United States.

Katherine Robb is a writer and attorney. Her writing has been published or is forthcoming in Blue Fifth Review, Gray’s Sporting Journal, the Chicago Tribune’s Printers Row Journal, Hobart , Jenny, New York University Annual Survey of American Law, and Taconic Press. She is currently working on a novel set in Eastern Oregon.

Guy Salvidge teaches high school English in rural Western Australia but he’d still like to be a writer when he grows up. His dystopian novel Yellowcake Springs was shortlisted for the Norma K Hemming Award in 2012, and the sequel, Yellowcake Summer, was published in 2013. He’s had short stories published in places like The Great UnknownKurungabaa and the first issue of Tincture Journal.

Michele Seminara is a poet, yoga teacher and editor from Sydney. Her writing has appeared in publications such as Bluepepper, Tincture JournalRegime, Seizure, Plumwood Mountain and Social Alternatives. She is also the managing editor of online creative arts journal Verity La. She blogs at http://micheleseminara.wordpress.com/ and is on Twitter @SeminaraMichele. Michele’s poem “Hoary” appeared in Issue Five of Tincture Journal.

Anna Spargo-Ryan is a writer and digital strategist from Melbourne. She has written for Overland, Kill Your Darlings, The Guardian, The Wheeler CentreMindfood, GRAM, and various other places. She was a panellist in the 2014 Digital Writers’ Festival. Her first novel will be published by Picador in 2015.

Les Wicks has performed at festivals, schools, prison etc. for over thirty-five years, and has been published in over 250 different magazines, anthologies and newspapers across eighteen countries in ten languages. He conducts workshops and runs Meuse Press which focuses on poetry outreach projects like poetry on buses and poetry published on the surface of a river. His eleventh book of poetry is Sea of Heartbeak (Unexpected Resilience) (Puncher & Wattmann, 2013). Les’ poem “Splash” appeared in Issue Six of Tincture Journal.

Bel Woods is a Melbourne-based writer currently studying at La Trobe University. She enjoys both contemporary and lyrical literary fiction, and will often explore female characters and the decisions they do and don’t make as a thematic thread. Her writing achievements include publications in [untitled], Verity La, page seventeen, fourWdotdotdash, Vine Leaves, Verandah and The Victorian Writer.


Issue Eight

Edoardo Albert is, on paper, an exotic creature: Italian, Sinhala and Tamil by birth, he grew up in London among the children of immigrants (it was only when he went to university that he got to know any English people). His proudest writing achievement was reducing a reader to helpless, hysterical laughter. Unfortunately, it was a lonely-hearts ad. Edwin: High King of Britain, his first novel, has just been published by Lion Fiction; at the moment, he’s writing volumes two and three of The Northumbrian Thrones trilogy, a biography of Alfred the Great with osteoarchaeologist Dr Katie Tucker and a spiritual history of London. He is quite busy. Edoardo is online at www.edoardoalbert.com, and on Facebook and Twitter, @EdoardoAlbert, too.

Elizabeth Allen is a poet and short story writer based in Sydney. She is the events manager at Gleebooks and associate publisher at Vagabond Press. She is the author of Forgetful Hands (Vagabond Press, 2005) and Body Language (Vagabond Press, 2012), which won the Anne Elder Award.

Charles Bane, Jr. is the author of The Chapbook (Curbside Splendor, 2011) and Love Poems (Kelsay Books, 2014). His work was described by the Huffington Post as “not only standing on the shoulders of giants, but shrinking them”. Creator of the Meaning of Poetry series for The Gutenberg Project, he is a current nominee as Poet Laureate of Florida.

Kevin Brown is a Professor at Lee University. He has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (forthcoming from Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press, 2009). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. He received his MFA from Murray State University.

Adam Byatt is an English teacher and occasional drummer with an interest in literary pursuits, rhythmic permutations, theological amplifications and comedic outbursts. He sifts through the ennui of life and catalogues them as potential story ideas, which collect as a pad of sticky notes on the fridge door. He occasionally finds loose change while searching for the perfect pen. You can find him on Twitter @revhappiness. Adam’s story “The Cicada Clock” appeared in Issue Six of Tincture Journal.

Ashley Capes is a poet, novelist and teacher from Victoria. He is a big Studio Ghibli fan and loves the brevity of haiku. Ashley’s poem “temple” appeared in Issue Five of Tincture Journal.

Jodi Cleghorn is an author, editor, publisher and occasional poet with a penchant for the dark vein of humanity. Her short fiction has been published in Australia and abroad. She is the author of River of Bones, an Australian gothic novella, No Need To Reply, a collection of flash fiction and co-author, with Adam Byatt, of the epistolary serial Post Marked: Piper’s Reach. Her stories “555” and “Nothing New To Begin” have appeared previously in Tincture Journal.

Emily Craven is an author of young adult fiction, with her latest comedy novel, The Grand Adventures of Madeline Cain, written as though you’re reading Facebook. In 2012 she completed a twelve month mentorship with Isobelle Carmody on her fantasy manuscript, Priori. She is the digital producer at Queensland Writers Centre, and blogs about ebooks and digital strategies for writers on her website. In 2013/14, Emily produced Brisbane Street Reads, an interactive, choose your own adventure locative literature event in Brisbane CBD, and in 2014 she was awarded the Brisbane City Council Innovation Award to turn it into an app. She has appeared in essay collections with Benjamin Law and Carmel Bird and her first flash fiction story, “Always”, will be published by Daily Science Fiction later this year. She can be found on Twitter @ebookrevolution.

Katelin Farnsworth is currently studying Professional Writing & Editing in Melbourne. She has been writing ever since she could lift a pen. She has been published in Spineless Wonders, Voiceworks, Ink Sweat & Tears, and was shortlisted in the Rachel Funari prize for fiction 2014. She dreams of endless libraries.

Patrick Fogarty is an author and poet. He writes creative non-fiction, historical non-fiction, memoir and poetry. Born and raised in the south Bronx, his works are infused with personal experiences from his childhood. He is a recent graduate of Yavapai College’s Creative Writing Program. His stories have been published in the last two issues of Threshold—the literary magazine of Yavapai College. Patrick and his bride Susan live in the mountains of Central Arizona with their two dogs—Lady, a beautiful German Shepherd and Mia, a lovely Irish Terrier. You can find him on Twitter @FogartyPat1.

Meg Henry is a columnist and the author of “Inferior Bedrooms”, a non-fiction series that parallels her bad choices in matters of the heart with popular novels. Though she still reads and drinks in excess, for now, she is happy.

Rebecca Howden is a Melbourne-based writer and editor who is currently preoccupied with themes of love, madness, femininity and beauty. Her fiction and essays have appeared in publications including The Sleepers Almanac, Kill Your Darlings, Crikey and others. Some of her work can be seen at rebeccahowden.com.au. Rebecca’s story “Transference” appeared in Issue Seven of Tincture Journal.

Kathryn Hummel writes non-fiction, fiction and poetry, often combined with her photography for digital performance. Her diverse work has been published throughout Australia, New Zealand, the US, and Eastern, Western and Southern Asia; she has lived in Australia, India and Bangladesh, where her PhD research in narrative ethnography, drawing on memory and conversations with women, was based. A former Café Poet (Australian Poetry) and Forever Now resident (APHIDS and Vitalstatistix), Kathryn was nominated for the 2013 Pushcart Prize and in the same year, won the Dorothy Porter Award for Poetry at the Melbourne Lord Mayor’s Creative Writing Awards. Poems from Here, Kathryn’s debut verse collection, is published by the Walleah Press.

Stephen Koster is an abominable snowman. He spends his days eating Sherpas and developing an advanced system of hand communication. His greatest fear is the little fuzzy things that get stuck between your toes when you wear socks. You can follow his work on Facebook: http://facebook.com/stephenkosterwriter. Stephen’s story “The Interesting People of Mount Kilimanjaro” appeared in Issue Six of Tincture Journal.

Barbara Donnelly Lane is an American writer with an MAT in English education and an MA in History. Last May she travelled to Havana to study Hemingway. Her work has appeared in a wide array of publications including The Palo Alto Review, Reader’s Break, Shine Brightly, descant, Delivered and The Amethyst Review. To learn more, visit www.barbaradonnellylane.com. Barbara’s non-fiction piece, “Chasing Hemingway in Havana” appeared in Issue Seven of Tincture Journal.

Nicholas Lawrence is in the process of becoming. Difficult to say what; all causes are final. http://www.nicholaslawrence.se/.

Abhishaike Mahajan is a senior at Westwood High School. He reads and interns at two magazines (PolyphonyHS and The Blueshift Journal, respectively), and this is his first publication. Also, he is an alumnus of the Iowa Young Writers Studio, which is a beautiful place he will forever remember. He hopes to continue writing and making art for the rest of his life.

Julie Proudfoot is author of The Neighbour, a psychological drama, and winner of Seizure Viva La Novella prize 2014. When she’s not renovating houses she writes a column for Vox Bendigo, the Bendigo Writers Festival Blog. She’s Scott Cam with a quill when she’s not Carrie Bradshaw with a hacksaw. Julie is working on her next novel about a homeless man entangled in a love tryst. Website: julieproudfoot.com. Twitter:@ProudMumbles.

Having previously spent time in the world of music and dance scholarship, Sophie Pusz now works for Australia’s largest independent publisher. She blogs at girlbooker.blogspot.com.au and tweets as@girlbooker.

Francine Rubin’s chapbook, Geometries, is available from Finishing Line Press. Her work has recently appeared in Hawaii Review, Spiral Orb, and The Light Ekphrastic, and her poem “Sacagawea” was the third place winner in Calyx Press’ 2013 Flash Fiction contest. More poems and thoughts appear at francinerubin.tumblr.com.

Deborah Sheldon’s short fiction has appeared in literary journals such as Island, and Tincture Journal, and also in various anthologies including Hard Labour (Crime Factory), The One That Got Away (Dark Prints Press) and 100 Lightnings (Paroxysm Press). Her crime-noir novellas are Ronnie & Rita and Dark Waters (both through Cohesion Press), while her collection Mayhem: selected stories (Satalyte Publishing) will be released in February 2015. Other credits include TV scripts, magazine articles, stage and radio plays, non-fiction books for Reed Books and Random House, and award-winning medical writing. Deb lives in Melbourne, Australia. Visit her at http://deborahsheldon.wordpress.com.

Matt Smith is a writer and freelance journalist living in Melbourne. He’s written for a number of Australian newspapers and magazines, and produced stories for ABC Radio National. He lives with his wife and a tuxedo cat named Millie. Matt’s stories “A Perfect Storm” and “Enjoy the Silence” appeared in Issues Two and Three of Tincture Journal respectively.

Grant Tarbard has worked as a computer games journalist, a contributor to football fanzines, an editor, a reviewer and an interviewer. He is now the editor of The Screech Owl. His work can be seen in such magazines as The Rialto, Ink, Sweat & TearsBone Orchard Poetry, The Journal, Southlight, Sarasvati, Earth Love, Mood Swing, Puff Puff Prose & Poetry, Postcards Poems and Prose, Playerist 2, Lake City Lights, The Open MouseMiracle, Poetry Cornwall, I-70, South Florida Review, Zymbol and Decanto.

Tony Walton is a Caribbean writer living in the Cayman Islands and his works have appeared in Storyteller Magazine, Moonkind Press, Whisperings Magazine, Mountain Tales Press, Out of Our Magazine, Poetry Bay Magazine, Burningword Magazine, Wilde Magazine, Nite-Writer’s International Literary Arts JournalAvalon Literary Review, Iceland Daily, Eastlit, Boston Poetry Magazine, Eunoia Magazine, and Olentangy Review. You can follow Tony on Twitter @caymanchess.

Amy Ward-Smith is an Australian writer who spent several years living in South East Asia. She currently resides in northern New South Wales, where she tries to find time to write in between caring for her three young children and studying an MA.

SB Wright is a semi-retired school teacher who lives rural in South Australia. He was born in the town of Nhulunbuy in Arnhem Land, though most of his life has been spent in Alice Springs. A graduate of NTU, he has spent his adult working life as a security guard, a martial arts instructor, a trainer in an international gaming company and as a teacher. His interest in poetry has been a constant if not always obvious presence. His work has been published in INDaily Adelaide, and the anthologies, The Stars Like Sand and 50 Haikus. He also produces a speculative fiction podcast called Galactic Chat and runs a Ditmar Award winning book review blog. His poem “The King” appeared in Issue Five of Tincture Journal.

Since she first spoke, Robyne Young has had a love affair with words. In the written form she has had short stories, poems and flash fiction published. She was a columnist for The Border Mail in Albury, writing about topics as diverse as disappearing chooks to neuroplasticity. Robyne also writes reviews for Newtown Review of Books and all too infrequently drops in on her blog robynewithane.wordpress.com. She tweets a lot as @Robyne7.


 Issue Seven

Bint Arab was born in Baghdad, raised in Brooklyn, and lives in Texas today; she is perpetually out of place and comfortable with that. She is an emerging writer, with stories published online at Expanded Horizons, Toasted Cheese, and in print in Best New Writing 2013. She administers the writers’ forum at www.bibliophilia.org/forum.

Seabird Brooks is a fiction writer from the South Coast of New South Wales who is currently backpacking through South America. His stories have been published by Verity La, Seizure, and Readers’ Digest. He was awarded runner-up in the 2014 Josephine Ulrick Literature Prize.

Michelle Cahill’s fiction appears in SoutherlyAntipodes, Mascara, TEXT, Etchings, the Carmel Bird Prize anthology Escape, Alien Shores and Small Wonders. She received a grant in fiction from the Literature Board in 2009 and a Developing Writer’s grant in 2013. She received an international fellowship at Kingston University and at Hawthornden Castle. She has blogged for Southerly and her essays have been published in journals.

Mary Chydiriotis is a social worker and aspiring writer living in Melbourne.

Benjamin Dodds is a Sydney-based poet whose work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including Southerly, The Sun Herald, various poetry anthologies and on Radio National. His first collection, Regulator, was launched by Puncher & Wattmann Poetry in February this year. An interview between Benjamin and our poetry editor Stuart Barnes can be found online in our interview series at tincture-journal.com/category/interviews.

Calista Fung. Ardent bibliophile. Full-time dreamer. Disiecti membra poetae. More of Calista’s writing can be found at her blog (lady-rye.tumblr.com) or at Thought Catalog (thoughtcatalog.com/calista-fung). Her non-fiction piece “It’s An Adventure If You Want It To Be” was published in Issue Six of Tincture Journal.

Ashley Goldberg is originally from Melbourne and now based in Canberra. He works in the public service by day and dabbles in short fiction by night. He has had work published in BMA MagazineMiles to Go Poetry Collection, Purely Dicta, and The RiotACT. He currently writes music reviews for The Music.

David M. Harris had never lived more than fifty miles from New York City until 2003. Since then he has moved to Tennessee, married, acquired a daughter and a classic MG, and gotten serious about poetry. All these projects seem to be working out pretty well. His work has appeared in Pirene’s Fountain (and in the Best of Pirene’s Fountain anthology), Gargoyle, The Labletter, The Pedestal, and other places. His first collection of poetry, The Review Mirror, was published by Unsolicited Press in September, 2013. On Sunday mornings, at 11 am Central time, he talks about poetry on WRFN-LP in Pasquo, TN (www.radiofreenashville.org).

Meg Henry reads and drinks in excess. Often at the same time. When not causing trouble at bars, or in hearts, around Brisbane, she pours out literary observations and bad dating advice at her blog inferiorbedrooms.com. Follow her exploits in real-time on Twitter @TheMegHenry.

Rebecca Howden is a Melbourne-based writer and editor who is currently preoccupied with themes of love, madness, femininity and beauty. Her fiction and essays have appeared in publications including The Sleepers Almanac, Kill Your Darlings, Crikey and others. Some of her work can be seen at rebeccahowden.com.au.

Tiggy Johnson’s poems have appeared in Cordite, Overland Audio II, Going Down Swinging, and Black Inc’s Best Australian Poems 2012. Svetlana or otherwise, her short story collection, was published in 2008. First taste, a poetry collection, in 2010, and That zero year, a poetry collection co-written with Andrew Phillips, in 2012. She is currently writing her family history in poetry and can be found online at www.tiggyjohnson.com. She has had poetry and fiction published in Issues Three and Six of Tincture Journal.

Merran Jones is an Australian physiotherapist who has been writing since 2013. She spent last year writing the first draft of a book which is still sitting on her kitchen table. Since the start of this year, she’s concentrated on short stories. Her work has appeared in: Alfie Dog Fiction, Writers’ Forum, Seizure Online, Darker Times Collection Volume Two, and One Page Literary Magazine.

Philip Keenan is a writer from Sydney who is interested in the strangeness of familiar things. He blogs at Johan Turdenmeier’s Miscellany (turdenmeier.wordpress.com) and you can find him on Twitter @Turdenmeier.

Gordon Kuhn is a published poet, essayist, and novelist. A disabled Vietnam Veteran, he started writing while in the Marines to relieve the stress. He holds a Masters Degree and taught at the University of South Florida for ten years before retiring. He is currently working on three major projects, including one about a serial murderer that terrorised the community he lives in.

Barbara Donnelly Lane is an American writer with an MAT in English education and an MA in History. Last May she travelled to Havana to study Hemingway. Her work has appeared in a wide array of publications including The Palo Alto Review, Reader’s Break, Shine Brightly, descantDelivered and The Amethyst Review. To learn more, visit www.barbaradonnellylane.com.

S. G. Larner is a denizen of sunny Brisbane, where she wrangles three children and several chickens. She revels in exploring the dark underbelly of the world in her works. You can find her at foregoreality.wordpress.com and on Twitter @StaceySarasvati. Her fiction has appeared in Issues Five and Six of Tincture Journal.

Darrell Lindsey is the author of Edge Of The Night (Popcorn Press, 2012), and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize (2007) and a Rhysling Award (2014). He won the 2012 Science Fiction Poetry Association Contest (Long Form category), and has garnered numerous international awards for his haiku and tanka. One of his poems is included in Haiku In English: The First Hundred Years (W.W.Norton & Company, 2013).

Jeff Meisner lives in the Pacific Northwest of the United States with his wife and son. He is a former newspaper reporter and magazine journalist and is currently a blog editor at a global technology company.

Douglas W. Milliken recently won Glimmer Train’s “Family Matters” contest and is the author of the novel To Sleep as Animals (Publication Studio / Pilot Editions 2014) and the codex White Horses (Nada 2010). His other work appears in McSweeney’sSlice, The Believer and elsewhere. “Arena” was written as part of a fellowship with the I-Park Foundation. www.douglaswmilliken.com.

Elisabeth Murray is a Sydney-based writer, currently studying at the University of Sydney. Her novella, The Loud Earth, was published by Hologram in 2014. She has had fiction and poetry published in Voiceworks, dotdotdash, Contrapasso magazine and several University of Sydney anthologies.

Kayla Pongrac is an avid writer, reader, tea drinker, and vinyl record spinner. When she’s not writing creatively, she’s writing professionally—for two newspapers and a few magazines in her hometown of Johnstown, PA. To read more of Kayla’s work, visit www.kaylapongrac.com or follow her on Twitter @KP_the_Promisee.

Robin Reich lives in Ulladulla, NSW and is studying to be a primary school teacher. He considers writing thusly: analogous to the task of an animator from the 1940s transferring hand-executed artwork from paper to animation cells, thousands and thousands and thousands of times, producing great depth. He believes his desire to publish writing is purely ego-driven. This is his first published work.

Mark Roberts is a Sydney-based writer and critic who has been widely published in journals and magazines since the 1980s. His book Stepping Out of Line was published in 1985, and his a new chapbook Six Months was published in 2013. He is currently editor of Rochford Street Review and P76 Magazine. His “poem in orange hues” was published in Issue Four of Tincture Journal.

Sue Stevenson would like to live in a cave, in Costa Rica and in basic financial comfort, not necessarily in that order. Her non-fiction piece “Blinded Me With Science” appeared in Issue One of Tincture Journal.

Ben Walter is a Tasmanian writer whose fiction has appeared in Island, Overland, Griffith REVIEW and The Lifted Brow. His debut poetry manuscript, Lurching, was shortlisted in the 2013 Tasmanian Literary Prizes.


Issue Six

Beau Boudreaux teaches English in Continuing Studies at Tulane University in New Orleans. His first book collection of poetry, RUNNING RED, RUNNING REDDER, was published in the spring of 2012 by Cherry Grove Collections. He has published poetry in journals including Antioch Review and Cream City Review, also in anthologies along with The Southern Poetry Anthology.

Adam Byatt is an English teacher and occasional drummer with an interest in literary pursuits, rhythmic permutations, theological amplifications and comedic outbursts. He sifts through the ennui of life and catalogues them as potential story ideas, which collect as a pad of sticky notes on the fridge door. He occasionally finds loose change while searching for the perfect pen. You can find him on Twitter @revhappiness.

Sam Ferree lives in Minneapolis with a poet and two cats. Professionally, he writes grants and copy for an environmental non-profit. Unprofessionally, he scribbles. His work has previously appeared inDaily Science FictionDeimos eZineAndromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine and Sybil’s Garage. To find out more about Sam, visit his website atsamferree.com or follow him on Twitter,@samferree.

Calista Fung. Ardent bibliophile. Full-time dreamer. Disiecti membra poetae. More of Calista’s writing can be found at her blog (http://lady-rye.tumblr.com/) or at Thought Catalog (http://thoughtcatalog.com/calista-fung/).

John Grey is an Australian poet, resident in the US. Recently published in The LyricVallum, and the science fiction anthology The Kennedy Curse, with work upcoming in Bryant Literary MagazineNatural BridgeSouthern California Review, and the Pedestal.

Deborah Guzzi is a resident of the USA. She travels for inspiration: China, Nepal [during the civil war], Japan, Egypt [two weeks before The Arab Spring] and most recently Peru. She has spent years examining the foundations of belief in higher power. Much of her writing explores the topic of imbalance, whether internal or external. She has published two illustrated volumes of poetry, The Healing Heart and Heaven and Hell in a Nutshell. Her works appear in Cha: Asian Literary Review published in China, Existere Journal of Arts and Literature published in Canada, and a number of literary venues in the US and UK. She writes articles for massage and aroma therapy magazines.

Stu Hatton is a Melbourne-based poet and freelance editor. He also works as a mental health researcher at the University of Melbourne. His poems have been published in The AgeBest Australian Poems 2012CorditeOverland and elsewhere. He sometimes posts things at outerblog.tumblr.com.

Meg Henry reads and drinks in excess. Often at the same time. When not causing trouble at bars, or in hearts, around Brisbane, she pours out literary observations and bad dating advice at her bloginferiorbedrooms.com. Follow her exploits in real-time @TheMegHenry.

Nathan Hondros is a poet with an interest in the surreal and abstract. He is an editor for Regime Books (http://regimebooks.com.au). His work has appeared in WesterlyThe AustralianMasthead, and other magazines and journals, including The Drunken Boat. His poetry appears in the US anthology Milk and Honey Siren (2013, Nostrovia!Poetry). The Australian Broadcasting Corporation has adapted his work into radio plays. A collection of his fiction, Man and Beast, was released in 2009 in collaboration with writer and theatre artist Damon Lockwood.

Andrew Hutchinson is a freelance writer, award winning author and father of two. His blog, twenty six (www.andrewhutchinson.com.au), recently won the Words and Writing category in the Australian Writers’ Centre “Best Australian Blogs 2014” competition. His story “Before Everything” appeared in Issue Four of Tincture Journal.

Tiggy Johnson’s words have appeared widely, including in CorditeIslandOverland Audio IIGoing Down Swinging, and in Black Inc’s Best Australian Poems 2012. Her short story collection Svetlana or otherwise was published in 2008, her poetry collections First taste in 2010 andThat zero year, co-written with Andrew Phillips, in 2012. She is currently writing her family history in poetry. Tiggy Johnson’s poem “Searching for Mary” appeared in Issue Three of Tincture Journal.

Stephen Koster is an abominable snowman. He spends his days eating Sherpas and developing an advanced system of hand communication. His greatest fear is the little fuzzy things that get stuck between your toes when you wear socks. You can follow his work on Facebook:http://facebook.com/stephenkosterwriter.

S. G. Larner is a denizen of sunny Brisbane, where she wrangles three children and several chickens. She revels in exploring the dark underbelly of the world in her works. You can find her at http://foregoreality.wordpress.com and (sporadically) on Twitter @StaceySarasvati. Her story “Diary of a Tree-Sitter” appeared in Issue Five of Tincture Journal.

w.m.lewis is an Australian poet and writer. His poetry has appeared in Alliterati MagazineBest Australian Poems 2011Cordite Poetry Review,EclecticismMultiversesPoV MagazineRailroad Poetry Projectstreet cake magazine, and The Night Light. You can find him (a little too often) on Twitter @w_m_lewis, and at his blog http://whatevertheysing.wordpress.com/.

Nathanael O’Reilly was born in Warrnambool and raised in Ballarat, Brisbane, & Shepparton. He now resides in Texas. He is the author of Distance(2014) and two chapbooks, Suburban Exile: American Poems (2011) and Symptoms of Homesickness (2010), all published by Picaro Press. He is the recipient of an Emerging Writers Grant from the Literature Board of the Australia Council. Over one hundred of his poems have been published in journals & anthologies around the world, including AntipodesAustralian Love PoemsCorditeLiNQBlackmail PressHarvest,Transnational LiteratureMascaraWindmills,Postcolonial TextProsopisiaRed River Review,SnorkelTincture and Social Alternatives.

Anna Ryan-Punch is a Melbourne writer and critic. Her publications include work in Southerly,OverlandAntipodesThe AgeWesterly, and Island. She also blogs at annaryanpunch.blogspot.com.

Frank Scozarri’s fiction has previously appeared in various literary magazines, including The Kenyon ReviewTampa ReviewPacific ReviewThe Nassau ReviewBerkeley Fiction ReviewEllipsis Magazine,South Dakota ReviewMinetta ReviewRoanoke ReviewReed MagazineHawai’i Pacific Review and The MacGuffin. Writing awards include Winner of the National Writer’s Association Short Story Contest and three Pushcart Prize nominations. Frank’s story “Children of the Tides” appeared in Issue Four of Tincture Journal.

Annette Siketa took to writing after a ‘routine’ eye operation robbed her of her eyesight in 2009. Since then, she has won numerous awards and is the author of Double Take, a cosy murder mystery novel set in a quaint seaside hotel, and the increasingly popular children’s adventure/supernatural novel, The Ghosts of Camals College.

Eleanor Talbot lives in Johannesburg. She has been published online and in print.

Su-May Tan is an advertising copywriter and mum who lives in Melbourne. She tries to write between kids, work and life. Originally from Malaysia, she has had one story published in the Silverfish New Writing 6 anthology and another shortlisted and commended in the Mslexia Short Story Competition 2014.

Rhys Timson has previously had stories published in 3:AM MagazineEvery Day FictionLiterary Brushstrokes, and the first issue of Tincture Journal. He is slowly building some kind of a website atwww.rhystimson.com as he hears it’s the thing to do.

Over thirty-five years Les Wicks has performed at festivals, schools, prison etc., and has been published in over 250 different magazines, anthologies and newspapers across eighteen countries in ten languages. He conducts workshops and runs Meuse Press which focuses on poetry outreach projects like poetry on buses and poetry published on the surface of a river. His eleventh book of poetry is Sea of Heartbeak (Unexpected Resilience) (Puncher & Wattmann, 2013).

Sam van Zweden is a Melbourne-based freelance writer. She blogs at Little Girl With a Big Pen, writes reviews and personal essays, and is also the online editor for Writers Bloc. This year Sam is doing honours at RMIT, writing about food and memory.


Issue Five

Cassandra Atherton is a Senior Lecturer in Literary Studies and Creative Writing at Deakin University. She has published a book of poetry, After Lolita (Ahadada Press, 2010), a novel, The Man Jar (Printed Matter Press, 2010) and is the editor of the Victorian edition of the international journal Ekleksographia. She has also written a book of literary criticism, Flashing Eyes and Floating Hair: A Study of Gwen Harwood’s Pseudonymous Poetry (Australian Scholarly Press, 2007). Her book of interviews with American public intellectuals is forthcoming from ASP.

Ashley Borodin was born in 1978 and is a Tasmanian author who writes about identity and alienation. He can be interrogated further via his website: http://ashleyborodin.weebly.com.

Fleur Brown-Beeby lives in the Adelaide hills and studies Creative Writing at the University of Adelaide. She works with prose and poetry to explore diversity of experience and mind. Fleur loves yoga and collecting periwinkles.

Ashley Capes is the author of four poetry collections. He teaches Media, Music Production and English in regional Victoria. He loves haiku and film, especially the animation of Studio Ghibli.

Jodi Cleghorn is an author, editor, publisher and occasional poet with a penchant for the dark vein of humanity. Her short fiction has been published in Australia and abroad. She is the author of River of Bones, an Australian gothic novella and co-author, with Adam Byatt, of the epistolary serial Post Marked: Piper’s Reach. Her story “555” appeared in Issue Three of Tincture Journal.

Elen Cox is a New Zealander/American writer, currently living in Washington, DC. Her fiction has been published in various literary journals, including Takahe Magazine and Vine Leaves.

Austin DeGroot is a veteran of five years in the US Navy and is now, at twenty-four, beginning his collegiate and writing career. This is his first published story.

Robin Wyatt Dunn lives in Los Angeles and is the author of three novels. A member of the Horror Writers Association, he is proud to have been born in the Carter Administration. You can find him at www.robindunn.com.

Sarah Taylor-Fergusson read Fine Art at Oxford University. She lives in Cheshire, England, and when she is not working as a fiction editor for a raft of publishing houses, she enjoys drinking coffee and wandering the borderlands of the Welsh Marches.

Michel Ge is a student living in Missouri who’s trying to figure what to do with his life. In the meantime, he writes about literature and philosophy at too-young-to-think.blogspot.com and aspires to publish his first novel sometime between now and the time he dies.

Murdock Grewar is a university student of physics and mathematics. Pondering ironically on the logical fallacies of human thought, Murdock draws his inspiration from the absurd juxtaposition between what man really knows about the universe, and what he likes to think. He tends to portray how different our one reality seems when you peer through the dissociative lens of a gentler soul. For more works by Murdock, drop him an email at mggrewar@hotmail.com. His poem was a winning entry in the 18-23 year-old category of the Young Writers Festival in Western Australia.

J.C.G. Goelz has had four plays selected for production in competitions, published about 70 scientific papers, and has been an associate editor of a scientific journal. Submitting his narrative fiction is a rather recent endeavour.

Meg Henry reads and drinks in excess. Often at the same time. When not causing trouble at bars, or in hearts, around Brisbane, she pours out literary observations and bad dating advice at her blog inferiorbedrooms.com. Follow her exploits in real-time @TheMegHenry.

Kelly Hulin is a quirky, modern woman who is queen of the blog world, but secretly prefers her short fiction. It’s hard to choose a genre, but that just makes her work original.

Ellie Kiosses is a writer of various tastes ranging from the horror and the paranormal to the comedic and the romantic. Fighting to keep her whole life on one plate, she also studies visual arts at Edith Cowan University, works and dances. She is forever unsure of which one she should fully commit to. Collections of her written works can be found online at http://www.wattpad.com/user/DoomKittyEllie. Her story was a winning entry in the 18-23 year-old category of the Young Writers Festival in Western Australia.

S. G. Larner is a denizen of sunny Brisbane, where she wrangles three children and several chickens. She revels in exploring the dark underbelly of the world in her works. You can find her at http://foregoreality.wordpress.com and on Twitter @StaceySarasvati.

David Lumsden works with the design of large computer systems, used to edit a literary magazine called Nocturnal Submissions, and has had poems published in various journals.

Shane Mac Donnchaidh is a mandolin-wielding, globe-trotting teacher originally from Newry, Co. Down. He has spent the last decade wandering through Asia and currently works as Principal at an international school in Bangkok, Thailand. He writes mainly short stories, most recently being publishing work in Per Contra journal.

Gargi Mehra writes fiction and humour in a determined effort to unite the two sides of the brain in cerebral harmony. Her fiction has appeared in Vine Leaves Literary Journal, GlassFire and Bartleby Snopes among other online avenues. She blogs at http://gargimehra.wordpress.com/.

Alyson Miller is a lecturer in literary studies at Deakin University, Australia. Her short stories and poetry have been published in both national and international publications, and she has recently published a book of literary criticism, Haunted by Words: Scandalous Texts (Peter Lang).

Michael Mohr is a published author living in the Bay Area. Formerly a literary agent’s assistant with Kimberley Cameron & Associates, Michael is also a freelance editor. You can locate his non-fiction in Writer’s Digest (as a guest blogger); The Kimberley Cameron & Associates Blog; The San Francisco Writers Conference Newsletter 2013. Michael’s fiction can be found in: Flash: The International Short Short Story Magazine; The MacGuffin;Gothic City Press; Alfie Dog Press; and more. Check out Michael’s website at http://michaelmohrwriter.com/. You can also find Michael on Twitter @Michael_Editor as well as Elance.com.

Vanessa Page is a Brisbane-based poet who hails from Toowoomba in Queensland. She is the author of two collections of poetry: Feeding Paper Tigers (ALS Press, 2012) and Confessional Box (Walleah Press, 2013). In 2011 and 2012 she was named runner-up in the Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Prize for an unpublished manuscript and in 2013 was shortlisted for the John Knight Memorial Manuscript Prize.

Jameson Rader enjoys analysing massive accumulations of professional football data and gambling. Despite a propensity for being a poor sports fan and failing to watch the games, he maintains a profitable record. He is a native of Las Vegas, Nevada, and has fiction forthcoming in a number of other journals.

Michele Seminara lives in Sydney, Australia, with her husband and three children. She has been practising and teaching yoga, Buddhism and meditation for fifteen years. Her writing has been published in several online and print journals, and she was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Her passions are emptiness (the Buddhist kind) and poetry. She blogs at http://micheleseminara.wordpress.com/ and is on Twitter@SeminaraMichele.

Simon A. Smith writes and teaches high school English in Chicago, where he lives with his wife and a murderous orange tabby named Cheever. His fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Hobart, Quick Fiction, Keyhole, Monkeybicycle, Whiskey Island, PANK and more. He likes it here.

Hao Guang Tse is interested in form and formation, creativity and quotation, lyrics and line breaks. His work has appeared in various anthologies and literary journals both online and in print, and in a couple of art exhibitions. He has a chapbook hyperlinkage (Math Paper Press 2013) to his name. Having gone through the Mentor Access Project under the guidance of Alvin Pang, he is currently in the University of Chicago’s Masters of Arts Program in the Humanities. He can be found either at vituperation.wordpress.com, or curled up against a good book.

SB Wright is a semi-retired school teacher who lives in a remote rural homestead in the South Australian outback—close to wheat fields, wildlife and the odd serial killing. He runs a speculative fiction review blog called Adventures of a Bookonaut and writes about poetry at Words Poetical.


Issue Four

John Abbott is a writer, musician and English instructor who lives with his wife and daughter in Kalamazoo, Michigan. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Potomac Review, Georgetown Review, Hawaii Pacific Review, Arcadia, Two Thirds North, upstreet, Midwestern Gothic, Bitter Oleander, and many others. His first novel The Last Refrain is now available from Sweatshoppe Publications, and his poetry chapbook Near Harmony is available from Flutter Press. For more information about his writing, please visit http://www.johnabbottauthor.com.

Tom Andes has published fiction, non-fiction, and the occasional poem in various venues including (most recently) Harp and Altar, Cannibal, and The Rumpus. He is the author of the fiction chapbook Life Before the Storm and Other Stories (Cannibal Books), and his work was anthologised in Best American Mystery Stories 2012. He lives in New Orleans.

Peter Bakowski: 2013 represents Peter Bakowski’s 30th year of writing poems.

Emilia Batchelor is twenty-two and hails from Sydney. She has had work featured in Thought Catalog, Reality Hands, and Scum Magazine. She is currently living in Seoul, Korea, teaching English.

Andrew G. Bennett is from Sydney, Australia, and has been writing fiction for over ten years. He has published three books of short stories, written an as yet unpublished novel and has had over thirty short stories and poems published in a variety of journals and magazines. He loves to write as he finds it to be an excellent outlet for his creativity and plethora of inspirations and ideas.

Emily Brugman is a third year writing student at UTS, and a bookseller at Gertrude and Alice bookshop cafe in Bondi, Sydney. She recently had a creative non-fiction piece published in the 2013 UTS Writers’ Anthology. Aside from writing, she likes surfing, growing herbs and sewing. She also rants and raves about some of her recent travels at knobbleknees.wordpress.com.

Christopher Cassavella lives in Brooklyn, NY. He has graduated from Kingsborough Community College with a degree in Liberal Arts and currently attends Brooklyn College.

Cher Chidzey migrated to Australia 38 years ago and has published poetry, short stories and a memoir called The House of 99 Closed Doors. Her stories have been read on Southern FM, 3CR, Radio Adelaide, and she was interviewed by R. Aedy on Radio National for the Life Matters program.

Rhett Davis is a fiction writer from Geelong, Australia. He has published stories in The Big Issue Fiction Edition, Sleepers Almanac, Verandah and Page Seventeen. He is currently studying an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. He can be found online at rhettdavis.com.

Matt Denniss is an environmental scientist who balances the cold scientific methodology of his professional life with the colour and warmth of words and music. He is hungry and angry but not fat or mean. He likes storms at the end of a hot day and writes short stories while listening to 90s rock. Matt’s work has appeared in Regime Magazine, Word Riot, Vibewire, Surreal Grotesque, Flash Fiction Offensive, Zinewest and Hypallage. Matt’s story “Sham” appeared in Issue Two of Tincture Journal.

Zenobia Frost is a Brisbane-based writer and critic with a PhD in burning the candle at both ends. Zen serves as Cordite’s assistant editor as well as a poetry editor with Voiceworks. Her forthcoming manuscript was recently shortlisted in the Thomas Shapcott Prize. You can find Zen on Twitter @zenfrost and blogging at http://www.zenobiafrost.wordpress.com/.

Meg Henry reads and drinks in excess. Often at the same time. When not causing trouble at bars, or in hearts, around Brisbane, she pours out literary observations and bad dating advice at her blog inferiorbedrooms.com. Follow her exploits in real-time @TheMegHenry.

Andrew Hutchinson’s first novel Rohypnol was published in 2007. He is working on his second.

Mark William Jackson’s work has appeared in various print and online journals including Best Australian Poems 2011, Popshot (UK), Going Down Swinging, Cordite, Rabbit Poetry Journal and SpeedPoets. For more information visit http://markwmjackson.com/.

B.J. Jones writes about rogue pharmacists, phantom limbed windmills, quidnuncs, Luciferian calories, amorous bowling shoes, Funkhousers, martyred coupons, Nietzschian wire hangers, invisible tomatoes and pen clicking adversaries while living in Dubuque, IA with his wife. Some of his writing even gets published.

Amanda Leduc is a Canadian novelist and essayist currently located in Hamilton, Ontario. Her essays and stories have appeared across Canada, the US, and the UK. Her novel, The Miracles of Ordinary Men, was released in North America in May of 2013 by Toronto’s ECW Press.

B. N. Oakman (Bruce to his friends), formerly an academic economist, started writing poems in 2006. He has since published many poems in Australia and overseas as well as a full-length book, In Defence of Hawaiian Shirts, and two chapbooks, Chalk Dust and Secret Heart. He was awarded a Literature Board grant and his work is recorded on an ABC Classics CD, Peter Cundall Reads War Poetry. Currently he’s preparing a second full-length collection which may or may not be titled Golden Boy. http://www.bnoakman.com/.

Fikret Pajalic came to Melbourne as a refugee, learned English in his mid-twenties and started writing years later. He has won and placed in competitions, been published in anthologies and literary magazines Westerly, Etchings, Mascara, Regime, Verge Annual, Hypallage, Platform, Structo, Akerand JAAM.

Candace Petrik is a writer from Melbourne who has been published in Wet Ink, Voiceworks and The Death Mook. She is currently studying Professional Writing and Editing at RMIT.

Mark Roberts is a Sydney-based writer and critic who has been widely published in journals and magazines since the 1980s. His book Stepping Out of Line was published in 1985, and he has a new chapbook, Six Months, due out late in 2013. He is currently editor of Rochford Street Review and P76 Magazine.

Anna Ryan-Punch is a Melbourne poet and critic. Her poetry has been published in Overland, Antipodes, The Age, Westerly, and Island. She blogs at annaryanpunch.blogspot.com.

Frank Scozzari is a Pushcart Prize nominee who resides in Nipomo, a small town on the California central coast. His award-winning short stories have appeared in numerous literary magazines including The Kenyon Review, Pacific Review, The Nassau Review, The Berkeley Fiction Review, The South Dakota Review, Roanoke Review, Two Thirds North, Reed Magazine, Hawai`i Pacific Review and The MacGuffin, and have been featured in Speaking of Stories, Santa Barbara’s preeminent literary theater.

Lynette Washington is a short story writer who is currently completing her PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Adelaide. Her stories have been published by Spineless Wonders and SWAMP. Her story “Promise” was runner-up in the Peter Cowan 600 Flash Fiction Competition, and this story, “Housing Needs Assessment” was recently awarded a High Commendation in the Footpath Library Short Story Competition. Lynette blogs regularly at http://lynettewashington.wordpress.com/ and can be followed on Twitter at @LynneTashi or on Facebook at Lynette Washington – Author.

Les Zigomanis is a freelance writer/editor based in Melbourne, Australia. He’s had stories and articles published in a bunch of places, and occasionally blogs on his website at http://www.leszig.com/.


Issue Three

David Adès is an Australian poet currently living in Pittsburgh. He has been a member of Friendly Street Poets since 1979. His collection Mapping the World was commended for the Anne Elder Award 2008. His poems have appeared widely in Australian and more recently American journals and literary magazines. He was a volunteer editor of the Australian Poetry Members Anthology Metabolism. Poems have recently been published or are forthcoming in 5 AM, Blue Pepper, Boston Literary Review, Cordite Poetry Review, Four and Twenty Poetry Journal, Illya’s Honey, InDaily, Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Poetica, Red River Review, Social Alternatives, Spiritus, Studio and The Fourth River.

Billy T. Antonio is an elementary grade teacher in the Philippines. Some of his fiction and poetry have been published in the fiction anthology Only Men Please which was launched in Bangalore, India, Red River Review, Sharpening the Green Pencil, New Mexico Wilderness Alliance Wild Guide 2011, Anak Sastra, Philippines Free Press, Philippine Graphic, Ani 33, Liwayway, Sirmata, Tinig and The Literary Apprentice.

Ron Barton is a hairy male with salt-and-pepper stubble. Likes long walks on the beach but prefers an afternoon of sitting on the couch watching football. Seeking readers aged 13-90 for intimate relationship with his neurotic, poetic self. Author of Ginninderra Press’ If God is a Poet, but modest despite this arrogant title. If you’d like to read between my lines, or just read the lines themselves, follow me@Teacher2Poet. Ron’s poems “Moon, Did You Get Fat With The Stars?” and “Hang Tough” were published in Issue One of Tincture Journal.

Chloë Callistemon is a Brisbane photographer and arts eclectivist. She has been a Jack Stamm Haiku Award finalist, performed as a bird as part of a.rawlings’s GIBBER, and has a work in an international anthology trying to save rhinos, among other things. Has pen and camera, will travel.

Tara Cartland is a fiction writer based in Melbourne, Australia. She was a 2013 SOYA Written Word finalist and she won the Overland and Victoria University Short Story Prize in 2012. Her other work has appeared in The Big Issue, Voiceworks, and Seizure Online. You can find her on Twitter @Tara_Skye and at taracartland.com.

Jodi Cleghorn is an author, editor and publisher with a penchant for the dark vein of humanity. Her short fiction has been published in Australia and abroad. She is the author of River of Bones, an Australian gothic novella and co-author, with Adam Byatt, of the epistolary serial Post Marked: Piper’s Reach.

Catherine Cole has published fiction and non fiction, poetry and short stories. She is an academic in the creative arts faculty at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales.

Dave Drayton is a PhD candidate in the Communications / Creative Writing program at UTS and a founding member of the Atterton Academy. His writing can be found in Rabbit, Voiceworks, Word Ways, People, and more.

Gerard Elson lives in Melbourne. His writing has appeared in The Big Issue and Higher Arc.

Meg Henry reads and drinks in excess. Often at the same time. She likes damaged men, instant coffee and intellect. While she is renowned for bad ideas, she is also an award-winning writer from Queensland. Follow her @TheMegHenry or visit inferiorbedrooms.com.

A. J. Huffman is a poet and freelance writer in Daytona Beach, Florida. She has published six collections of poetry, all available on amazon.com. Her work has appeared in numerous national and international literary journals. Currently she edits six online poetry journals for Kind of a Hurricane Press. Find more about A. J. Huffman, including links to her work, on Facebook and on Twitter @poetess222.

Tiggy Johnson’s poems have appeared in Cordite,Overland Audio II, Going Down Swinging, and Black Inc’s Best Australian Poems 2012. Svetlana or otherwise, her short story collection, was published in 2008. First taste, a poetry collection, in 2010, and That zero year, a poetry collection co-written with Andrew Phillips, in 2012. She is currently writing her family history in poetry and can be found online at www.tiggyjohnson.com.

Alinta Krauth is a twenty-something who spends a lot of time around dogs, though that isn’t evident in her writing. She works as a university tutor teaching digital media, and researches crowd movement for contemporary music festivals. Her website, www.alintakrauth.com is currently under construction.

Gexter Ocampo Lacambra has published some of his poems in both English and Filipino in the Philippine Graphic Weekly Magazine, the Philippine Star, and in ANI, the literary book produced annually by the Cultural Centre of the Philippines. He has also published mainstream short fiction and stories for children in Liwayway, the premier weekly magazine in Filipino. He placed second in the Tulaan sa Tren 2, a nationwide Filipino poetry writing contest sponsored by the National Book Development Board and Light Railway Transit. He was a 2006 fellow in the LIRA (Linangan sa Imahen, Retorika, at Anyo) poetry clinic under the tutelage of Dr. Virgilio Almario, a National Artist for Literature. He now lives with his family in Milan, Italy.

Ira McGuire is a Gold Coast based writer and current PhD candidate (cue violins). You can find her on Twitter @ira_mcguire.

Jessica McLean is a lecturer in Human Geography at Macquarie Unversity, and she is interested in sharing critical thinking in creative ways. She writes a poem a day at smilingatcrocodiles.tumblr.com and has had commentary pieces published in Overland and New Matilda. Poems by Jess also appear in Australian Love Poems 2013 and Stoned Crows and Other Australian Icons.

Suzanne Moore is a mother of two from Perth who has found the road to writing a long and winding one. Initially trained as a veterinarian, she returned to study and is now undertaking a PhD in creative writing and comparative literature at Murdoch University. Her writing interests sway towards family narratives, the experience of time and realities that are slightly askew from our own.

Nathanael O’Reilly was born in Warrnambool and raised in Ballarat, Brisbane and Shepparton. He now resides in Texas. He is the author of two chapbooks, Suburban Exile: American Poems (2011) and Symptoms of Homesickness (2010), both published by Picaro Press, and a recipient of an Emerging Writers Grant from the Literature Board of the Australia Council for the Arts. His poetry has been published in journals around the world, including Antipodes, Cordite Poetry Review, LiNQ, Blackmail Press, Harvest, Transnational Literature, Mascara Literary Review, Windmills, Postcolonial Text, Prosopisia, Page Seventeen, Red River Review, Correspondances Oceaniennes and Social Alternatives.

Cheryl Pearson lives in a small town just outside Manchester in the UK. She has been published in Best of Manchester Poets (Puppwolf Press), The Journal, and 14 Magazine, among others. Currently she is working on her first collection.

Pam Riley is a native New Yorker who still misses the Big Apple. She likes to spend her free time going to the theatre, museums and travelling. She has been writing for years and enjoys working in both poetry and prose. The little quirks and imperfections of life are her inspiration.

Kristen Rohde has been writing ever since she was a young child. She has written many short stories, a full-length novel, has a bachelor’s degree in Creative Writing and is currently studying a Diploma of Editing. Her passion lies with young adult fiction but she enjoys exploring the many genres and styles of popular fiction.

Matt Smith is a Melbourne-based writer who has had work published in newspapers and on radio around the country. He’s hard at work on his first novel and a comedy radio play called Pharoah, which you can support via this Pozible campaign. He can be found on Twitter @nightlightguy, or at http://www.endofthespectrum.net. Matt’s story “A Perfect Storm” appeared in Issue Two of Tincture Journal.

Konstantina Sozou-Kyrkou has studied Literature and obtained her MA in Creative Writing from Lancaster University, UK. She has been previously published by The Fine Line Editorial Consultancy in their anthology Even Birds are Chained to the Sky and online by the Five Stop Story Press as well as twice in the literary online magazine The Missing Slate. She is currently working towards completing a short story collection.

Fanni Sütő is a twenty-three year-old poet and fiction writer. She writes in English and Hungarian and finds inspiration in reading, paintings and music. Her big dream is to become a Young Adult fiction writer. She doesn’t mind travelling either. Her heaven would be a library with an everlasting supply of café latte and cupcakes, with an endless screening of Dr. Who. She’s been featured in numerous magazines and anthologies in Hungary. This short story in Tincture Journal is her first international publication. Some of her poems, writings and musings can be found on her blog at http://taleshrine.wordpress.com/.

Joanna Wulthuizen as born in Melbourne, Victoria, and currently lives in Sydney, New South Wales. She is an acclaimed visual artist, and writer of short fiction and poetry.


 

Issue Two

Michael J. Abolafia, a resident of New Jersey, has been scribbling strange sonnets and sestets since he discovered the transcendental pleasures of reading and writing as a child. Now eighteen, he whiles away the long and indolent hours daydreaming and praying for rain or snow. He will be studying English Literature and Anthropology at Columbia University in the Fall of 2013. His fiction and poetry have appeared in Eschatology, The Edison Literary Review, eFiction Magazine, Supernatural Tales, Nameless Magazine, I Know What I Saw: Poems of the Unexplained, and scores of local newspapers and school literary magazines.

Stuart Barnes’s poems and creative non-fiction have appeared or are forthcoming in The Warwick Review, Poetry Ireland Review, Assaracus: A Journal of Gay Poetry, The Nervous Breakdown, Southerly Journal, Overland, Going Down Swinging, Cordite Poetry Review, Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed, The Weekend Australian Review, Mascara Literary Review, RABBIT and Verity La. Poetry Editor of Tincture Journal, he lives in Queensland, Australia, and can be followed via Twitter @StuartABarnes and SoundCloud.

Zoe Barron is a freelance writer, editor and bicycle enthusiast. She is highly prone to travel, but Fremantle, WA is home now, and probably will be for a while. She writes regularly for Artshub, Drum Media and Six Thousand, and has been published in The Lifted Brow, Voiceworks, and Going Down Swinging, among others. Her blog is here at zoebarron.wordpress.com.

Matt Denniss is an environmental scientist who balances the cold scientific methodology of his professional life with the colour and warmth of words and music. He is hungry and angry but not fat or mean. He likes storms at the end of a hot day and writes short stories while listening to 90s rock. Matt’s work has appeared in Regime Magazine, Word Riot, Vibewire, Surreal Grotesque, Flash Fiction Offensive, Zinewest and Hypallage.

Phillip A. Ellis is a freelance critic, poet and scholar. His chapbooks, The Flayed Man and Symptoms Positive and Negative, are available. He is working on a collection for Diminuendo Press. Another has been accepted by Hippocampus Press. He is the editor of Melaleuca. His website is at http://www.phillipaellis.com/.

Michelle Faye currently resides in Mount Lawley, Western Australia and is completing a Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing at Murdoch University. Her short story ‘Father’ was recently shortlisted and received a commendation for the Katharine Susannah Prichard 2012 Short Fiction Awards. As well as writing fiction she dabbles in poetry. Some of her words can be found amongst the pages of ‘Poetry d’Amour 2013’, released by WA Poets Inc.

Christian Fennell is married with five children living in a cottage on a lake in rural Ontario, Canada. He worked for many in the film and television industries as screenwriter, commercial director and producer. He is now exploring the full-time world of fiction. ‘In a Small Town’ is his first short story.

Ben Flake is an English teacher at Nanjing’s prestigious China Pharmaceutical University.

Roxanne Groebel is a writer from Sydney. After studying journalism at University, she decided to get herself some copywriting work—a girl has to pay her bills somehow. She has written for Samesame, Channel V, MasterMousePatrol, and lipmag and has held internships at everywhere from lad’s magazines to foodie blogs; although, she’s her most creative when writing autofiction for her erotic blog smartandfilthy.blogspot.com.au. Roxanne believes no matter how messy, sweaty or complex human beings are, there is always an unexpected beauty to found among us.

Mel Hall is a writer and musician based in Fremantle, Western Australia. She is originally from the Wheatbelt town of Northam. You can find her stories in the Sleeper’s Almanac No. 8, And Swamp Writing Journal No. 7. You can find her on twitter @dearhella.

Amanda Hamilton is currently a senior at Truman State University, working toward a BFA in Creative Writing. Her work has been published in CC&D Magazine, Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, The Evansville Review and the current issues of Menda City Review and See Spot Run. Her website is at http://amandabhamilton.wordpress.com/.

Meg Henry reads and drinks in excess. Often at the same time. She likes damaged men, instant coffee and intellect. While she is renowned for bad ideas, she is also an award-winning writer from Queensland. Follow her @TheMegHenry or visit inferiorbedrooms.com.

Eliza-Jane Henry-Jones has a BA in Psychology and English. She has been published in Southerly, Island, Award Winning Australian Writing, page seventeen, [untitled], Etchings, Verge, FourW and Voiceworks, among other places. She was a young Writer-in-Residence at the Katharine Susannah Prichard Writers’ Centre in 2012. Her novel manuscript, Long Breath, is represented by Calidris Literary Agency. She works with high-risk families and children at a drug rehabilitation centre in Melbourne and is passionate about using horses in counselling and therapy. Her website is ehenryjones.com.

Marnie Hirst is a professional singer who has sung for her supper in locales both exotic (Tahiti) and chaotic (Tokyo), and also a not-so-secret Lit Nerd in the middle of a Literature and Composition degree. Passionate about prose, wild about wine and unashamedly attached to The Cat, she is determined that writing will one day be Plan B, when she is too old and too wrinkly to be seen on stage anymore…

Jonathon Kane currently resides in the Blue Mountains of Australia, and is currently reading Francis Picabia.

Sarah Martin was diagnosed at the age of sixteen with the degenerative eye condition called Retinitis Pigmentosa. After this diagnosis she realised that she needed to begin “seeing” the world she lived in with more than just her eyes and it is because of this that she discovered a beautiful relationship with poetry. Eighteen years on she now views herself as a visually impaired poet who lives with, through, around, beside and because of her visual impairment. You can find her blog at sarahjmartin.blogspot.com.au.

Rachael Mead lives on a property in the Adelaide Hills in South Australia and is currently completing a PhD in creative writing at the University of Adelaide. Last year she had a short collection of poems, Sliding Down the Belly of the World, published with Wakefield Press and her full length manuscript, The Sixth Creek, was both awarded a Varuna Publisher Fellowship with Picaro Press and shortlisted for the 2012 Adelaide Festival Literature Awards unpublished manuscript prize.

Tamara Pratt’s short stories have been published in Australian and USA anthologies and have placed in several short story competitions, including the Glass Woman Prize. In 2011, Tamara was awarded a Fellowship by Eleanor Dark Foundation and stayed at the Varuna Writers’ House where she was mentored by Australian crime author Marele Day. Tamara has authored crime fiction and young adult novels. By profession, Tamara is an Information Technology Project Manager and resides in Brisbane with her husband and three children. Tamara is active in a number of writing groups and is serving as Vice President of the Fellowship of Australian Writers Queensland (FAWQ), and Senior Editor of Compose Online Journal. Currently, Tamara is represented by literary agent, Rick Raftos Management. Tamara’s website is www.tamarapratt.com and you can follow her on twitter @TamaraPratt.

Shobha Rao is currently a student of fiction in the Master of Fine Arts program at San Francisco State University. She has previously been published by Gorilla Press, The Missing Slate, and in lulu.com, and in the anthology “Building Bridges”. In 2013, she was awarded the Gita Specker First Place Award for Best Dramatic Monologue by the San Francisco Browning Society.

Deborah Sheldon’s short fiction has appeared in many literary journals such as Island, Cottonmouth, Page Seventeen, Crime Factory, and [untitled]. Her crime novella, ‘Ronnie & Rita’, was published by Dark Prints Press in April 2013. Other writing credits include television scripts (such as ‘Neighbours’, ‘Australia’s Most Wanted’, ‘State Coroner’), feature articles for national magazines, non-fiction books (Reed Books, Random House), stage and radio plays, and award-winning medical writing. Deb lives in Melbourne, Australia. Visit her at deborahsheldon.wordpress.com.

Matt Smith is a Melbourne based writer, and has had work published in newspapers and on radio around the country. He’s hard at work on his first novel. He can be found on Twitter @nightlightguy, or at http://www.endofthespectrum.net.

Todd Sullivan currently lives in South Korea, teaching English. He is working on a speculative fiction / urban horror novel, which takes place in Korea on the small island of Jeju, which is at the southernmost tip of the country. He has a simple little website at www.acrowsflying.com.

Nick Sun has been a professional comedian for over ten years, but is now focusing more heavily on his writing.

Darcy Tindale is a dramatic arts teacher, director of stage productions, actor, author, theatresports player, puppeteer, and has appeared in TVC, film and on stage. Her plays, poems, articles, short stories, radio satire and comedy skits have been published, performed and received numerous awards. Darcy has her ATCL and FTCL Performance and Directing diploma. Her first love is story, the author’s voice and the scope of a novel which inspired her to begin studying a BA in Creative Writing. She has recently been shortlisted in the Monash University Undergraduate Prize for Creative Writing.

Karen Vegar grew up in Cairns and has lived along the Australian east coast, as well as in New York City. She has published articles about martial arts and fitness, the law and travel. When not writing, she enjoys drinking vodka, reading Russian literature and eating pickles.

Ben Walter is a Tasmanian writer and poet whose work has been published in Island, Griffith REVIEW, Cordite and The Review of Australian Fiction. He is the author of “Below Tree Level” and editor of the award-winning anthology “I Sleep in Haysheds and Corners”.

Kate Whitfield is a fiction writer from Melbourne. Her short stories have appeared in many Australian literary journals, including Southerly, Westerly and Antithesis.

Giovanni Zuniga currently lives in San Francisco and is a junior at San Francisco State University studying Cinema with an emphasis in screenwriting. He will be featured in Burningword Literary Journal and Oulipo Ponobongo 2: Anthology of Erotic Wordplay for poetry and will have two short stories in Sweet Dream and Night Terrors Anthology published by Static Movement Press. When he graduates he plans to embark on a wanderlust adventure starting with Prague to teach English, drink beer, and write in his free time.


 

Issue One

Shawn Aveningo is an award-winning poet whose work has appeared in dozens of publications including Pirene’s Fountain, Obsidian, Poetry Now, Featherlit, Convergence, Survivor’s Review, POETZ, Cliterature, Savage Melodies & Last Call Serenades, WTF, Wait a Minute, I Have to Take Off My Bra, and Seattle Erotic Anthology. Shawn hosts a monthly poetry show in Folsom, CA (VerseOnTheVine.com) and has featured in Sacramento, San Francisco, Sausalito, Seattle and St Louis, and hopes to entertain audiences in more cities that start with the letter ‘S’. Shawn is also a founding member of the performing group, Poetica Erotica.

Ron Barton is a hairy male with salt-and-pepper stubble (32). Likes long walks on the beach but prefers an afternoon of sitting on the couch watching football. Seeking readers aged 13-90 for intimate relationship with his neurotic, poetic self. Author of Ginninderra Press’ If God is a Poet, but modest despite this arrogant title. If you’d like to read between my lines, or just read the lines themselves, follow @Teacher2Poet.

Matthew Dexter, like nomadic Pericú natives before him, survives on a hunter-gatherer subsistence diet of shrimp tacos, smoked marlin, cold beer, and warm sunshine. He lives in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. He can be found at matthewdexter.com.

Merlin Flower is an independent artist and writer.

Terry Groves has been writing for most of his life and has enjoyed success with both short stories and poetry but his love is stories. Dark drama, humour and pure horror are his most frequent thoughts. He is currently working on a short screenplay as well as more stories. Like most writers, he has longer works on the go. Terry lives in Duncan, British Columbia. He writes for the love of the craft. www.terrygroves.com.

Amy Han is a Melbourne-based author and founder of Creative Write-it!, which is dedicated to inspiring and encouraging young writers. She published her first novel, Ru Dreaming in 2011. When she isn’t playing with words she can often be found practising circus tricks and parkour. www.amyhan.com.au.

Meg Henry reads and drinks in excess. Often at the same time. She likes damaged men, instant coffee and intellect. While she is renowned for bad ideas, she is also an award-winning writer from Queensland. Follow her @TheMegHenry or visit inferiorbedrooms.com.

Craig Hildebrand-Burke lives in Melbourne and works nearby, teaching English and Creative Writing to secondary students. He’d like to say he is working on a novel, but to be more accurate the novel seems to be working on him. This is his first published story. He is on Twitter @hildebrandburke.

Jeremy Johnson is a writer-fighter; he lives for words and warfare, usually in that order. Jeremy graduated from RMIT’s Creative Writing degree in 2012 and has trained in shukokai karate for fifteen consecutive years. He writes everything from e-publishing factsheets to slam poetry to fantasy novels. In all his worlds, Jeremy is trying to make an impact.

Fayroze Lutta writes because she is far away and with only her Olivetti typewriter to communicate to those back home. Her only real home is her typewriter. She has had all the emotions over her typewriter; she has been blind drunk, smoked thousands of Galoisse cigarettes and on occasion sniffed an oily rag to keep her upright hunched, stabbing at the keys until she falls asleep.

Corey Mesler has published in numerous journals and anthologies. He is the author of six novels, three books of short stories, three full-length collections of poetry, as well as numerous chapbooks of poetry and prose. John Grisham once blurbed one of his novels, as did Lee Smith, and Marshall Chapman. He and his wife own Burke’s Book Store in Memphis TN, and she tells him which shirt goes with which pants. He can be found at www.coreymesler/wordpress.com.

Angela Meyer is a Melbourne-based writer and reviewer. Her work has appeared in The Lifted Brow, the Australian, Crikey, The Big Issue and many others. A chapbook of her flash fiction is to be published by Inkerman & Blunt in early 2014, and she’s currently editing an anthology of creepy short stories for Spineless Wonders.

M. K. Richards lives in Sydney with her fiancé and their beloved staffy, Izzy. She
spends most of her days reading, writing and crocheting; and her nights awaiting
the zombie apocalypse. You can find her on Twitter, @mkrawrchards and blogging at mkrawrchards.wordpress.com.

Guy Salvidge is a Western Australian writer and English teacher. He is the author of the dystopian novel Yellowcake Springs, which won the IP Picks Best Fiction Award in 2011 and was shortlisted for the Norma K Hemming Award in 2012. Yellowcake Summer, the sequel, will be published by Glass House Books in 2013. Blue Swirls is the second story to feature Seeker Tyler Bramble. The first, The Dying Rain, will be published in Tobacco Stained Sky from Another Sky Press later this year.

Miro Sandev is a poet, short fiction writer and reviewer, based in Sydney. His poems have appeared in Regime Magazine,Red Room Company Disappearing, Hypallage and Dissent. He reviews theatre and literature for ArtsHub. His essays have appeared in Arena Magazine and New Matilda.

J. J. Steinfeld is a Canadian fiction writer, poet, and playwright who lives on Prince Edward Island, where he is patiently waiting for Godot’s arrival and a phone call from Kafka. While waiting, he has published fourteen books, including Disturbing Identities (Stories, Ekstasis Editions), Should the Word Hell Be Capitalized? (Stories, Gaspereau Press), Would You Hide Me? (Stories, Gaspereau Press), Misshapenness (Poetry, Ekstasis Editions), and A Glass Shard and Memory (Stories, Recliner Books). His short stories and poems have appeared in numerous anthologies and periodicals internationally, and over forty of his one-act plays and a handful of full-length plays have been performed in North America.

Sue Stevenson likes to think she would have liked science in high school if Brian Cox was her science teacher. She would one day like to try living in a cave with satellite internet access. She blogs at discombobula.blogspot.com.

Rhys Timson lives in London and has previously been published by Aesthetica, Opium, and Literary Brushstrokes. He also has a story forthcoming in 3:AM Magazine. He is working on a novel, though it sometimes feels as if the novel is working on him.

Linda Tzoref was born and raised in the Midwest of the United States, currently lives in the Deep South and received her B.A in philosophy and an MFA in creative writing. In addition to Tincture, she’s had work appear in such journals as Hot Metal Bridge and Diverse Voices Quarterly. You can read more of her short fiction in the Spring 2013 issue of Subterranean Quarterly as well. While she prefers the warmer weather of Atlanta, she is occasionally distressed at the natives’ inability to understand her fluent sarcasm…

Bill Vernon served in the United States Marine Corps as an infantryman (three years) and a Short Airfield For Tactical Support (SATS) technician, then studied English literature at the University of Dayton and Miami University (Ohio). These many years later, he is still recovering from those experiences. Writing is his therapy, along with exercising outdoors and doing international folkdances. His poems, stories and non-fiction have appeared in a variety of magazines and anthologies, and Five Star Mysteries published his novel OLD TOWN in 2005.

Rafael Ward’s purpose is to give people glorious stories to tell. Some have appeared in Dotdotdash, Going Down Swinging and The Big Issue Fiction Edition. He also competes in poetry slams and giant-sized chess games. Graduated from RMIT Creative Writing in 2012, he often wonders what he’ll do with the rest of his life, but the answer’s always the same. Writing and falling in love.

Sam van Zweden is a Melbourne-based writer, who loves creative non-fiction, good food, cross-stitch, and the ache that happens the day after a really good run. Her work has appeared in publications including Voiceworks, Killings, The Big Issue and The Emerging Writer Online Journal. She blogs at www.littlegirlwithabigpen.wordpress.com.